Category Archives: Cave Tours

Cave Tour, 12 days

The cave tour, part of the ecotourism and Eco-tours. This tour is meant for the normal public from the ago of 15 and older. It also means climbing, dragging your feet through the mud, becoming wet, walk under the burning sun, becoming dirty, etc. You’re warned!


Day 1 – Arrival
Day 2 – Sorek (Avshalom) Cave
Day 3 – Bell Cave
Day 4 – Zedekiah’s Cave
Day 5 – Hariton Cave
Day 6 – Malcham
Day 7 – Caves of Qumran
Day 8 – HaYonim (The Pigeons) Cave
Day 9 – Tabun (Tanur) Cave (Oven Cave)
Day 10 – Hanahal (El-Wad) Cave
Day 11 – Pa’ar Cave
Day 12 – Departure

Where are your accommodations?

Day 1 – Jerusalem
Day 2 – Jerusalem
Day 3 – Jerusalem
Day 4 – Jerusalem
Day 5 – Jerusalem
Day 6 – Dead Sea
Day 7 – Dead Sea
Day 8 – Acre
Day 9 – Haifa
Day 10 – Haifa
Day 11 – Nahariyya/Tiberias

What will you see?

  1. Sorek (Avshalom) Cave
  2. Bell Cave
  3. Zedekiah’s Cave
  4. Hariton Cave
  5. Malcham
  6. Caves of Qumran
  7. HaYonim (The Pigeons) Cave
  8. Tabun (Tanur) Cave (Oven Cave)
  9. Hanahal (El-Wad) Cave
  10. Pa’ar Cave
  11. Old and New city of Jerusalem
  12. Acre
  13. Haifa
  14. Golan
  15. Dead Sea

Day 1 – Arrival

This is the day that you arrive in Israel. Well, it’s not the case for those who are already here or who are living in Israel.

For those who are arriving in Israel, will be picked up from the airport by the guide and driver from Shalom Israel.

  • For those, who ordered the hotels, they will be driven by bus to their hotel and for this tour it means Jerusalem.

During the drive to your hotel, the bus will stop multiple times if the group requires so. One stop is for stretching your legs and to eat real food and drink. That is included in the tour! So, please don’t spend your money on that.

When you’ve arrived at your hotel, you check in and relax. The guide is with you and stays with you until you go back home at the end of the tour. He is available day and night (for example when you can’t sleep!).

The evening (this totally depends how late you arrive in Israel), we have a surprise for you in Jerusalem. Please, don’t eat before, because we will dine in Jerusalem.


Day 2 – Sorek (Avshalom) Cave

(Click here for map)

Avshalom Cave, also known as Soreq Cave or Stalactites Cave, is a 5,000 sq m cave in Israel, unique for its dense concentration of stalactites
Avshalom Cave, also known as Soreq Cave or Stalactites Cave, is a 5,000 sq m cave in Israel, unique for its dense concentration of stalactites.
Traditional breakfast before you go into the Negev

Traditional breakfast

After your breakfast at your hotel in Jerusalem, the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, click here for map.

Also called the Stalactite Cave, this small cavern is in a nature reserve on the western slopes of the Judean mountains between Jerusalem and Beit Shemesh.

Workers blasting at a limestone quarry 44 years ago came across it by accident. Inside were stalactites and stalagmites up to 13 feet long. Some of them are believed to be at least 300,000 years old, while others are still forming.

The Israel Nature and Parks Authority installed wooden walkways, lighting and handrails inside the cave and offers an audiovisual presentation and guided tour.

At the end of the day, we return to our hotel. At your hotel, dinner is waiting.

Day 3 – Bell Cave

(Click here for map)

Delicious breakfast

Delicious breakfast

After your breakfast at your hotel in Jerusalem, the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, Click here for map.

One of many caves to explore at Beit Guvrin-Maresha National Park — which lies in the “land of a thousand caves” region of central to southern Israel – the Bell Cave complex is a series of 70 large caves connected by passageways. The tallest of the Bell Caves are more than 16 feet high.

Dug out as quarries during the Early Arab period in the seventh-11th centuries CE, the caves got their name because the digging was done in the shape of a bell. Arabic inscriptions and crosses can still be seen on the walls. Even Hollywood finds the area awesome; Sylvester Stallone’s Rambo III was filmed here.

We return to our hotel in Jerusalem.


Day 4 – Zedekiah’s Cave

Cave of Zedekiah
Healthy breakfast too if you really want

Healthy breakfast too if you really want

After your breakfast at your hotel in Jerusalem, the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, Click here for map.

Cave of Zedekiah

Steeped in legend, Zedekiah’s Cave goes back about 1,000 feet under the northern wall of Jerusalem’s Old City, and more than 2,000 years in history. People long believed that this was the cave described in the bible’s account of how Zedekiah, Jerusalem’s last biblical king, attempted to flee to Jericho during a Babylonian siege. He was captured and tortured, which is why the spring at the back of the cave is called “Zedekiah’s Tears.”

Cave of Zedekiah

However, the cave has no exit, so it wouldn’t have made a good escape route. Still, it has great significance because archaeologists believe it was from this quarry that workers cut the giant stones to build the Second Temple in the fourth century BCE. The cave is lighted and has signage in Hebrew, Arabic and English. About half of its length is open to the public.

At the end of the day, we return to Jerusalem.


Day 5 – Hariton Cave

Hariton Cave

(Click here for map)

Bedouin breakfast

Breakfast

After your breakfast at your hotel in Jerusalem, the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, Click here for map.

Israel’s largest limestone cave is shaped like a labyrinth, necessitating a guide from the nearby field school, lanterns and appropriate shoes. It’s located near Bethlehem and Herodion south of Jerusalem, near the town of Tekoa. According to ancient historian Josephus Flavius, Hariton was part of an underground system of escape routes used by Jews fleeing the Romans more than 2,000 years ago.

Hariton Cave

At the end of the day we return to our hotel in Jerusalem.


Day 6 – Malcham

(Click here for map)

Breakfast from heaven

Breakfast from heaven

After your breakfast at your hotel near the Jerusalem, the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, Click here for map.

The largest cave in Israel and the largest salt cave in the world, Malcham is one of more than 100 salt-rock caves in Mount Sedom at the southwest end of the Dead Sea. Open free to the public, this rare formation has huge rooms, vertical shafts over 426 feet deep, stalactites and stalagmites made of salt.

“It’s a river cave,” explains Frumkin. “Water flowing in a surface stream flows underground and dissolves the salt, creating caves – a process that is still going on when there is strong rain over the mountain about once a year.”

At the end of the day, we go to our new hotel near the Dead Sea.


Day 7 – Caves of Qumran

(Click here for map)

Food and Cuisine - RestaurantAfter your breakfast at your hotel near the Dead Sea, the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, .

In the year 68 CE, a Jewish cult occupying these caves overlooking the northwest end of the Dead Sea fled from the invading Romans. But first they hid their treasures in clay jars. They were only discovered starting in 1947, and became known as the Dead Sea Scrolls. The parchments – including the oldest known Bible — can be seen at the Israel Museum’s Shrine of the Book or online.

The caves are now a tourist site complete with a video presentation. You can walk through a room where ancient scribes may have worked and an area where the caves’ ascetic inhabitants dried dates and made clay pots like the ones used to store the scrolls for two millennia.

Our tour though, will lead us to the known and unknown (for the tourist) caves of the Qumran caves. There are more then 250 caves discovered and a few presented to the normal tourists.

Dead Sea

At the end of the tour, we might take a dip in the Dead Sea if someone volunteers. As a tip, you have there good showers to wash the dust, dirt and sweat and enables you to redress. Take pots and pans with you, because you might collect the mud of the Dead Sea, because at home you need to pay a fortune for that.

At the end of the day, the bus drives us to our hotel in Acre (Akko).


Day 8 – HaYonim (The Pigeons) Cave

HaYonim (The Pigeons) Cave

(Click here for map)

'Fruits and Grains' the foods of-the future according to Baha'i

‘Fruits and Grains’

After your breakfast at your hotel in Acre (or Akko), the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, Click here for map.

Situated in a limestone bluff in the upper Galilee, HaYonim Cave was used as a living space on and off between 250,000 and 12,000 years ago. Excavations have turned up blades, cooking hearths, finished floors and graves.

“This is a good example of a prehistoric natural cave. Such caves could be associated with two types of humans that coexisted in the last Ice Age – Homo sapiens and Neanderthals,” explains Frumkin. “In the Natufian period about 11,000 years ago, people started building small houses, and there are such structures inside the entrance of the cave.”

HaYonim (The Pigeons) Cave

Visitors can explore part of the cave for free. The archeological excavation area is blocked off. Our guide will bypass that little rule for you. Please don’t start digging though.

At the end of the day, we move hotel to Haifa.


Day 9 – Tabun (Tanur) Cave (Oven Cave)

(Click here for map)

Baha'i food

Baha’i food

After your breakfast at your hotel in Haifa, the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, Click here for map.

Not far from HaYonim, a 120,000-year-old Neanderthal-type female skeleton was discovered in the Tabun Cave, so named because it resembles a chimney (“oven” is “tanur” in Hebrew and “tabun” in Arabic). Different groups of humans lived inside it from 500,000 to 40,000 years ago.

Tabun is the highest one of three Carmel Caves in the Nahal Me’orot Nature Reserve. Stairs lead from a visitor’s center to the entrance. Archeologists found many hunting and foraging tools here along with piles of fallow deer bones and other leftovers of ancient meals.

The guide will explain why that is so important for the ancient history in the world, the development of the modern human and the land of Israel and it’s unique history.

At the end of the day we return to our hotel in Haifa.


Day 10 – Hanahal (El-Wad) Cave

Hanahal (El-Wad) Cave

(Click here for map)

The food plate

The food plate

After your breakfast at your hotel in Haifa, the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, Click here for map.

This is the largest of the Carmel Caves. Here you can watch an audiovisual presentation about prehistoric daily life, and see a model of a skeleton illustrating burial customs of the Natufian culture 10,000 years ago. More than 100 ancient skeletons were discovered buried here in a tightly flexed position, some with ornaments made of stone, bone or shell. (Don’t worry: The bodies were long since removed from the premises … but maybe we might find some when the guide starts wandering around with you.)

Hanahal (El-Wad) Cave

At the end of the day, we go to our new hotel in Nahariyya/Tiberias.


Day 11 – Pa’ar Cave

(Click here for map)

Druze food

Druze food

After your breakfast at your hotel in Nahariyya/Tiberias, the bus is waiting for you. Officially, the tour starts at 9:00 in the morning, so we leave at 8:15. For more information about the route, Click here for map.

This limestone sinkhole in the Upper Galilee was formed by water flowing from the surface Pa’ar Stream to the underground.

“This is maybe the best example of such a limestone phenomenon in Israel,” says Frumkin. “In winter you can follow the water with your eye and see it sinking underground. It’s in a nice [3.5-acre] nature reserve open to the public for free. Just be prepared for mud because it’s an active cave.”


Day 12 – Departure

Popular foods include cabbage, milk, sour cream, curds, mushrooms, lard, cucumbers, tomatoes, apples, berries, honey, sugar, saltWe will bring you back to the airport after breakfast (this depends on your departing time).

National Parks and Reserves Tour, Central and South Israel, 12 days

Avshalom Cave, also known as Soreq Cave or Stalactites Cave, is a 5,000 sq m cave in Israel, unique for its dense concentration of stalactites
Avshalom Cave, also known as Soreq Cave or Stalactites Cave, is a 5,000 sq m cave in Israel, unique for its dense concentration of stalactites.

The National Parks and Reserves Tour for Central and South Israel, 12 days, is part of the ecotourism and Eco-tours. This tour is meant for the normal public from the ago of 15 and older. It also means climbing, dragging your feet through the mud, becoming wet, walk under the burning sun, becoming dirty, etc. You’re warned!


Day 1 – Arrival
Day 2 – Yotvata Hai-Bar Nature Reserve
Day 3 – Ein Avdat National Park
Day 4 – Shivta National Park
Day 5 – Ein Gedi Nature Reserve
Day 6 – Ein Prat Nature Reserve
Day 7 – Ein Tzukim Nature Reserve
Day 8 – Qumran National Park
Day 9 – Masada National Park
Day 10 – Avshalom (Stalactites) Cave
Day 11 – Beit Guvrin National Park
Day 12 – Departure

Hotels in:
Day 1 – Eilat
Day 2 – Eilat
Day 3 – Be’er Sheva/Sde Boker
Day 4 – Be’er Sheva/Sde Boker
Day 5 – Dead Sea
Day 6 – Dead Sea
Day 7 – Dead Sea
Day 8 – Dead Sea
Day 9 – Dead Sea
Day 10 – Jerusalem
Day 11 – Jerusalem/Kiryat Gat

What kind of accommodations do we offer?

  1. Hostel
  2. Guest House/Inn
  3. 3 Star hotel
  4. 4 star hotel
  5. 5 star hotel
  • Depending on your choice of accommodations, the price of the tour might be cheap or very expensive.
  • It’s possible to mix the accommodations; for example day 1-4 in 5 star hotel, day 5-10 in 3 star hotel, day 11 in hostel

Recommended photo gear:

  • DSLR with interchangeable lenses
  • Wide angle lens
  • Tripod
  • Flash
  • Remote control (optional)
  • Small camera bag and/or dust cover (if you enter the hide-out caves at Hurvat Midras you are going to need some gear protection, as this is going to be extremely dusty)

Note: This tour is also recommended to non-photographers.

What to wear: Hiking boots/shoes or good walking shoes, long comfortable trousers that can take a rub as well as dirt and dust. You are likely to get dirty.

Important items:

  • Sun hat or cap
  • Sunscreen or sunblock with sufficient UV protection
  • Water (2-3 liters) (the guide takes care for water in the bus in case that)


Day 1 – Arrival

Airplane

Airplane to Israel

This is the day that you arrive in Israel. Well, it’s not the case for those who are already here or who are living in Israel.

For those who are arriving in Israel, will be picked up from the airport by the guide and driver from Shalom Israel.

  • For those, who ordered the hotels, they will be driven by bus to their hotel and for this tour it means Eilat.

During the drive to your hotel, the bus will stop multiple times if the group requires so. One stop is for stretching your legs and to eat real food and drink. That is included in the tour! So, please don’t spend your money on that.

When you’ve arrived at your hotel, you check in and relax. The guide is with you and stays with you until you go back home at the end of the tour. He is available day and night (for example when you can’t sleep!).


Day 2 – Yotvata Hai-Bar Nature Reserve

Click here for the map – Hotel in Eilat

Yotvata Hai-Bar Nature ReserveEarly morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

The Yotvata Hai-Bar Nature Reserve is a 3,000-acre (12 km2) breeding and re-acclimation center administered by the Israel Nature Reserves & National Parks Authority, situated in the Southern Arabah near Yotvata.
The Yotvata Hai-Bar is the desert counterpart of the Carmel Hai-Bar Nature Reserve which operates in the country’s Northern Mediterranean forest.
Endangered and locally extinct animals mentioned in the Bible are bred here for possible reintroduction to the Negev desert. Yotvata Hai-Bar Nature ReserveThe Asian wild ass has already been reintroduced in the Makhtesh Ramon into the wild. In addition the park has some rare desert animals, which are not native to Israel, like the scimitar oryx and the Red-necked ostrich from northern Africa.

At the end of the day, we drive to our new hotel in Be’er Sheva/Sde Boker.


Day 3 – Ein Avdat National Park

Early morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

Ein Avdat or Ein Ovdat is a canyon in the Negev Desert of Israel, south of Kibbutz Sde Boker. Archaeological evidence shows that Ein Avdat was inhabited by Nabateans and Catholic monks. Numerous springs at the southern opening of the canyon empty into deep pools in series of waterfalls. The water emerges from the rock layers with salt-loving plants like Poplar trees and Atriplexes growing nearby.

Springs
Ein Avdat National ParkThe southernmost spring is Ein Ma’arif, featuring a series of waterfalls and pools. A Byzantine fortress overlooks the spring and adjacent agricultural land. Further north is Ein Avdat, a 15-meter high waterfall that flows into an 8-meter deep pool of water divided by a small artificial dam.
Located near the northern entrance of the park is a spring called Ein Mor, named for the spice myrrh.
Growing around the springs are Poplar trees and Atriplexes, commonly known as saltbush, which grows on riverbanks and can tolerate salinity.Ein Avdat National Park

At the end of the day, we return to our hotel in Be’er Sheva/Sde Boker


Day 4 – Shivta National Park

Early morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

Shivta, is an ancient city in the Negev Desert of Israel located 43 kilometers southwest of Beersheba. Shivta was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in June 2005.

History
Long considered a classic Nabataean town on the ancient spice route, archaeologists are now considering the possibility that Shivta was a Byzantine agricultural colony and a way station for pilgrims en route to the Saint Catherine’s Monastery in the Sinai Peninsula.
Roman ruins from the first century BCE have been unearthed in the southern part of the town, but most of the archaeological findings date to the Byzantine period. Shivta’s water supply was based on surface runoff collected in large reservoirs.

Three Byzantine churches (a main church and two smaller churches), 2 wine-presses, residential areas and administrative buildings have been excavated at Shivta. After the Arab conquest in the 7th century CE, the population dwindled. It was finally abandoned in the 8th or 9th Century CE.
In 1933-34, American archaeologist H. Colt (son of the gun manufacturer) conducted a dig at Shivta. The house he lived in bears an inscription in ancient Greek that reads: “With good luck. Colt built (this house) with his own money.”
The wine presses at Shivta give an insight into the scale of wine production at the time. According to the calculations of archaeologists, the Nabatean/Byzantine village of Shivta produced about two million liters of wine. Adjacent to the site is a large farm that uses Nabatean agricultural techniques of irrigation, sowing and reaping.

At the end of the day, we go to our new hotel near the Dead Sea.


Day 5 – Ein Gedi Nature Reserve

Early morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

Ein Gedi nature reserve was declared in 1971 and is one of the most important reserves in Israel. The park is situated on the eastern border of the Judean Desert, on the Dead Sea coast, and covers an area of 14000 dunams (one modern dunam equals the area of one decare).
The elevation of the land ranges from the level of the Dead Sea at 423 meters (1,388 ft) below sea level to the plateau of the Judean Desert at 200 meters above sea level. Ein Gedi nature reserve includes two spring-fed streams with flowing water year-round: Nahal David and Nahal Arugot. Two other springs, the Shulamit and Ein Gedi springs, also flow in the reserve. Together, the springs generate approximately three million cubic meters of water per year. Much of the water is used for agriculture or is bottled for consumption.
Ascent from Tel Goren to the En Gedi Spring at Ein GediThe reserve is a sanctuary for many types of plant, bird and animal species. The vegetation includes plants and trees from the tropical, desert, Mediterranean, and steppian regions, such as Sodom apple, acacia, jujube, and poplar. The many species of resident birds are supplemented by over 200 additional species during the migration periods in the spring and fall. Mammal species include the Nubian ibex and the rock hyrax.
The Ein Gedi national park features several archaeological sites including the Chalcolithic Temple of Ein Gedi and a first-century CE village. The park was declared in 2002 and covers an area of 8 dunams.

We return to our hotel near the Dead Sea.


Day 6 – Ein Prat Nature Reserve

Early morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

Wadi Qelt is home to a unique variety of flora and fauna. St. George’s Monastery and one of the oldest synagogue in the world, Shalom Al Yisrael Synagogue, are located in Wadi Qelt, which has been identified with the biblical “Perath” mentioned in Jeremiah 13:5.

Ancient history
Wadi Qelt contains monasteries and old Christian locations. Several aqueducts have been found along the stream, the oldest dating to the Hasmonean period (2nd century BC). The Wadi Qelt Synagogue, built as part of a Hasmonean royal winter palace, is believed to be one of the oldest synagogues in the world. The site was home to the winter palaces of Hasmonean kings and Herod the Great. The area was occupied by Israel in 1967, and hence parts of the wadi were declared a nature reserve, the Nahal Prat Nature Reserve.
Qubur Bani Isra’in are huge stone structures which rise from a rocky plateau overlooking Wadi Qelt

Modern times
On December 20, 1968, Israeli lieutenant-Colonel Zvi Ofer (Tzvika Ofer), commander of the elite Haruv unit, former Military Governor of Nablus and recipient of the Israeli medal of valour, was killed in action in Wadi Qelt while pursuing Arab militants who had crossed the Jordan.
Wadi Qelt was the site of several [Palestinian political attacks] on Israeli hikers following the 1993 Declaration of Principles peace agreement between Israel and the PLO. Dror Forer and Eran Bachar were shot to death on October 9, 1993, Ori Shahor and Ohad Bachrach were shot and killed on July 18, 1995, and Hagit Zavitzky and Liat Kastiel were stabbed and killed on April 25, 1997.

We return to our hotel near the Dead Sea.


Day 7 – Ein Tzukim Nature Reserve

Early morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

Ein Feshkha is a nature reserve and archaeological site on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea, about three kilometers south of Qumran in the West Bank, which is occupied by Israel. It is named for a spring of brackish water in the area. The Ein Feshkha nature reserve consists of an open reserve with pools of mineral water for bathing surrounded by high foliage and another section that is closed to visitors to protect the native flora and fauna.
The saline wetlands of Einot Tzukim are the only known place in the world where populations of Blue and Dead Sea killifish (Nevit Hula and Nevit Yam Hamelakh) live side by side. The Israel Nature and Parks Authority and the Israeli Ministry of Agriculture are constructing pools in the area to preserve these native fish. Two of the pools are complete and are now populated by tens of thousands of fish. Measures are also being taken to preserve the tilapia population.
Enot Tsukim is divided into three sections: the northern “closed reserve,” the central “visitors reserve,” and the southern “hidden reserve.” The closed reserve is only open to scientists by special invitation. This section covers approximately 2,700 dunams. The 500-dunam visitors reserve features wading pools filled with natural spring water.
Due to ecological concerns, the hidden reserve is closed to the public apart from tours on Fridays.

We return to our hotel near the Dead Sea.


Day 8 – Qumran National Park

Click here for the map – Hotel near the Dead Sea

Early morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

Qumran is an archaeological site in the West Bank managed by Israel’s Qumran National Park. It is located on a dry plateau about a mile from the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea, near the Israeli settlement and kibbutz of Kalya. The Hellenistic period settlement was constructed during the reign of John Hyrcanus, 134-104 BCE or somewhat later, and was occupied most of the time until it was destroyed by the Romans in 68 CE or shortly after. It is best known as the settlement nearest to the Qumran Caves where the Dead Sea Scrolls were hidden), caves in the sheer desert cliffs and beneath, in the marl terrace. The principal excavations at Qumran were conducted by Roland de Vaux in the 1950s, though several later campaigns at the site have been carried out.

We return to our hotel near the Dead Sea


Day 9 – Masada National Park

Click here for the map – Hotel near the Dead Sea

Early morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

Masada Mountain & Cable Car

Masada is an ancient fortification in the Southern District of Israel situated on top of an isolated rock plateau, akin to a mesa, on the eastern edge of the Judean Desert, overlooking the Dead Sea. Herod the Great built palaces for himself on the mountain and fortified Masada between 37 and 31 BCE. According to Josephus, the Siege of Masada by troops of the Roman Empire towards the end of the First Jewish-Roman War ended in the mass suicide of the 960 Sicarii rebels and their families hiding there. Masada is located 20 kilometers (12 mi) east of Arad.
Masada is one of Israel’s most popular tourist attractions.

At the end of the day we go to our new hotel in Jerusalem


Day 10 – Avshalom (Stalactites) Cave

Click here for the map – Hotel Jerusalem

Early morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

Avshalom Cave, also known as Soreq Cave or Stalactites Cave, is a 5,000 sq m cave in Israel, unique for its dense concentration of stalactites
Avshalom Cave, also known as Soreq Cave or Stalactites Cave, is a 5,000 sq m cave in Israel, unique for its dense concentration of stalactites.

The cave was discovered accidentally in May 1968, while quarrying with explosives, near Hartuv, 3 km east of Bet Shemesh, Israel. It is 83 m long, 60 m wide, and 15 m high.
The cave is named after Avshalom Shoham, an Israeli soldier killed in the War of Attrition. After its discovery, the location of the cave was kept a secret for several years for fear of damage to its natural treasures.
The temperature and the humidity in the cave are constant year round, and it is now open to visitors, in the heart of the 67-dunam Avshalom Nature Reserve, declared in 1975. In 2012, a new lighting system was installed to prevent the formation and growth of algae.
Some of the stalactites found in the cave are four meters long, and some have been dated as 300,000 years old. Some meet stalagmites to form stone pillars.

We return to our hotel in Jerusalem.


Day 11 – Beit Guvrin National Park

Click here for the map – Hotel in Jerusalem

Early morning we all have breakfast at your hotel. We need to prepare for the day, which starts officially at 9:00 in the morning. That means that we must leave with the bus at 8:15 at most.

Beit Guvrin-Maresha National Park is a national park in central Israel, 13 kilometers from Kiryat Gat, encompassing the ruins of Maresha, one of the important towns of Judah during the time of the First Temple, and Beit Guvrin, an important town in the Roman era, when it was known as Eleutheropolis.
Archaeological artifacts unearthed at the site include a large Jewish cemetery, a Roman-Byzantine amphitheater, a Byzantine church, public baths, mosaics and burial caves.

Burial caves
The Sidonian burial caves were the family tomb of Apollophanes, the leader of the Sidonian community in Beit Guvrin. The Sidonian caves are the only ones that are painted inside. The caves were burial caves for the Greek, Sidonian and Edumite inhabitants of Beit Guvrin. The first and largest cave has paintings of animals, real and mythic, above the niches where the corpses were laid. A cock crows to scare away demons;the three-headed dog Cerberus guards the entrance to the underworld; a bright red phoenix symbolizes the life after death. The Tomb of the Musicians is decorated with a painting showing a man playing the flute and a woman playing the harp.

Bell caves
There are about 800 bell-shaped caves located in the area. Many of the caves are linked via an underground network of passageways that connect groups of 40-50 caves. The bell caves were dug during the Arabian Period for chalk to cover roads. The walls are beige colored limestone. There are numerous bell caves within the park grounds and events are held in one of them. It is large (over 60 feet (18 m) high), airy and easily accessible.

The Church of Saint Anne
Saint Anne’s church was first built in the Byzantine period and then rebuilt by the Crusaders in the 12th century. The ruin is known in Arabic as Khirbet (lit. “ruin”) Sandahanna, the mound of Maresha being called Tell Sandahanna. The freestanding remains of the apse are well preserved

Amphitheater
The remains of a Roman amphitheater were uncovered in the mid-1990s. The amphitheater was built in the 2nd century, on the northwestern outskirts of Beit Guvrin. This amphitheater, in which gladiatorial contests took place, could seat about 3,500 spectators. It had a walled arena of packed earth, with subterranean galleries. The arena was surrounded by a series of connected barrel vaults, which formed a long, circular corridor and supported the stone seats above it; staircases led from the outside and from the circular corridor to the tribunes It was built for the Roman troops stationed in the region after the suppression of the Bar Kochba rebellion. The amphitheater is an elliptical structure built of large rectangular limestone ashlars. It was in use until destroyed in the Galilee earthquake of 363.

At the end of the day we return to our hotel in Jerusalem.


Day 12 – Departure

We will bring you back to the airport after breakfast (this depends on your departing time).

Custom Tours specially made for you

Day Tours
Religious Tours
Walking Tours
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Rent Wim the Tour Guide

For custom tours, you need to have the following:

  1. An itinerary (those mentioned here one for example). Click here to customize these tours for you)
  2. A guide. You can use the information here instead of renting a guide, but in the end it’s more expensive and a huge hassle.
  3. Transport. Transports can be that you hire a mini-bus with driver, or you rent a car or let your guide do it for you (click here for more info).
  4. Hotels. You can use the info here, or on bookings.com or generally the Internet or let your guide negotiate the best deals for hotels for you.
  5. Food. You can use the restaurants here in this itinerary or ask the guide.
  6. What you need to supply is
    1. Airplane tickets
    2. Visa and insurance

For costs, questions, queries and other related information, click here.

The listed tours in this page is only a set of samples or templates for you to choose and/or mix with. Using those templates, you can easily create a itinerary, which will suit you, you family and/or group. Ask Wim to help you out.

Tour itineraries already published

  1. Family and Children tour, 12 days
  2. Classical Israeli-Gems Tour, 10 Days
  3. Family and Children tour, 10 days
  4. Orthodox Christian Tour, 10 days
  5. Orthodox Christian Tour, 8 days
  6. Orthodox Christian Tour, 6 days
  7. Orthodox Christian Tour, 4 days
  8. Day tour Jerusalem
  9. Day tour Sea of Galilee
  10. Walking day tour Tel Aviv
  11. Catholic Tour Israel, 7 days
  12. Catholic Tour Israel, 5 days
  13. Catholic Tour Israel, 3 days
  14. Catholic Pilgrimage Tour, 8 days
  15. Day tour Old Tiberias Walking Tour
  16. Day tours Nine Farm Tours for Families
  17. Day tour Old-City Ramparts Walk tour, Jerusalem
  18. Day tour Luzit Caves – Do-it-your-self in caving
  19. Boat tours – Touring in the Red Sea, Sea of Galilee and cruises
  20. Wine Tasting & Israel Adventure Experience
  21. A Holy Land Pilgrimage in the Footsteps of the Virgin Mary
  22. Bus tours
  23. Camel tours
  24. Cave tours
  25. Children tours – Specific tours for your children and teenagers
  26. City tours – More city tours then we already have
  27. Day tours – More day tours in a specific theme
  28. Family tours – More family tours, but in a specific theme
  29. Jeep tours
  30. Catholic tours
  31. Christian tours
  32. Evangelic tours
  33. Orthodox tours
  34. Pilgrimage tours
  35. Wine tours

Tours in the make

  1. Follow the Footsteps of Jesus in Jerusalem
  2. Adventure tours
  3. Music tours
  4. Culture tours
  5. Food and Wine tours
  6. History tours
  7. Church tours

Rent Your Tour Guide Here

Wim Vincken

I’m specialized in Private and Tailor-made Israel Tours for Groups, Families, Individuals, and Corporate Clients – All Tours May Be Booked As Day Tours From Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Haifa or Anywhere in Israel! Call me +972-52-483-9865 or email me: wim.vincken@gmail.com Contact me

Why using a private tour guide in Israel?

It’s cheaper.
If you think that you can find the cheapest prices for hotels, transport, entry fees and also you know the right places you want to see, because you have an internet connection and find anything you want to see and experience online, then dream on. I know the best places for you, depending on your preferences and requirements. I live here in Israel already for more then 24 years and counting. And I’m doing the private guide tours already for more then 15 years. And I created tours for tourists already for longer then that. Creating tours means at least knowing all the prices and negotiate the best conditions. So, when you arrive here with a book in your hand, and try to figure out the best things to enjoy, this is always more expensive then hire me.
You earn my daily rate back immediately. Contact me

It is about telling the great story behind the sights
Apart from visiting some of the same places, there is no resemblance between a private tour and do-it-your-self or an average group tour. While a group tour can be no more than just seeing a collection of sights, my tour is about telling and developing the amazing story of this country – past and present. When I unfold this complex and interesting story gradually and carefully, you can absorb it easily and enjoy it in such a way that when you depart, you have had the thrilling sensation of experiencing a great journey in time, cultures, religions, views and tastes. It is truly a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Contact me

It is about understanding your wishes
In your private tour, I adapt the tour exactly to your expectations, needs, wishes and limitations. Before you arrive in Israel, we discuss your requests in detail through phone calls, Skype and emails. We travel according to your interests and pace, with maximum flexibility of the hours and program. Contact me

And how do we follow your wishes?
On this website, you can see hundreds of interesting sights in many different categories; also you will see several itineraries (tours). None of them will be your tour exactly – they are presented here so that you can get a general idea of what I can do. After I get to know you and your expectations, I will be able to design your specific itinerary, discuss it with you and change it until you are satisfied.
As we travel on the tour, we will follow this itinerary but will also keep the option open to change it whenever you feel like doing so. Contact me

Guiding only Guiding and Transportation Consulting

Rates

On multiple day tours, where we will be sleeping outside the Tiberias area, the customer is also responsible to pay my lodging and meals.

Guiding only
That means that you hire me only as a guide, but the transportation, lodging and meals is up to you. Call me +972-52-483-9865 or email me: wim.vincken@gmail.com Contact me

My fee is $150 per full day of touring. This means either a walking tour or a tour where you provide transportation. My fee for half day tours is $100. In some cases I need to charge transport money. Go to Top

Guiding and Transportation
I arrange for you myself as the guide and transportation as you require. Call me +972-52-483-9865 or email me: wim.vincken@gmail.com

  1. Guiding, vehicle, driver and fuel for a full day
    – Up to 6 people for up to 10 hours and 200 km is $450.
  2. Guiding, vehicle, driver and fuel for a full day
    – Up to 16 people for up to 10 hours and 200 km is $750.
  3. Guiding, vehicle, driver and fuel for a full day
    – Up to 30 people for up to 10 hours and 200 km is $950.

Keep in mind that there are many guides who both drive and guide at the same time and charge a higher (or similar) rate. Here you are getting a dedicated driver besides me as a guide. This means that I can give you my full attention while the driver gives his full attention to the road! Also there are often sites where the driver will be able to drop us off in one area to walk around and tour and then pick us up in a different area rather than having to walk back to the vehicle. This is by far the best way to tour!
The rate may vary based on the size of vehicle you need as well as the distance to be traveled etc. Once I have the details I can give you an exact quote. On multiple day tours you will have to provide for food and lodging for the driver as well. Go to Top

Consulting only
Consulting such as preparing itineraries, booking hotels, arrange transportation, etc. for days when I will not be guiding you is billed at $40 per hour or a fixed amount at $100. Go to Top. Call me +972-52-483-9865 or email me: wim.vincken@gmail.com Contact me

Deposit

A 25%, non-refundable deposit must be paid in order to reserve days. This can be paid via Post office (MoneyGram, Western Union, TransferWise or similar) (it’s uncomplicated and quick). Once the days are booked the deposit cannot be refunded in case of cancellation. (You may change the day up to 14 days before the booked day as long as I have your desired day available.) Go to Top. Contact me

Payment of the balance

The balance must be paid at the end of the first day of touring in cash (Shekels, USD or Euro is fine). Go to Top.


Call me +972-52-483-9865 or email me: wim.vincken@gmail.com


Contact me