Category Archives: Restaurants

Restaurants in Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv has loads of restaurants in all kinds, representing all areas of the Arab world, as is the rest of the world. And you know what, you can always find something for any budget. You can choose a boutique type restaurant, or you can choose a restaurant, where you have a meal for a few shekels. And then there are those restaurants, which are based on the rising crop of ‘chef restaurants’ and an ever-growing number of swanky brasseries.


Click here for the gallery about the restaurants mentioned in this article.


Natan Cohen in his restaurant. Photo by Kobi Kalmanovitz
Natan Cohen in his restaurant. Photo by Kobi Kalmanovitz

If you’re self-catering, the best fresh fruit and vegetables in town are sold at the Carmel Market. But at the same Carmel market you can find also meat. At this market there is a so called ‘back-section’, where you can buy the ‘forbidden fruit’, eh, pork meat.

Eating in Tel Aviv
Eating in Tel Aviv

Convenience supermarkets offering a good selection of products, reasonable prices and late-night hours are found all over the city. Between Sunday and Friday, many restaurants offer ‘business lunch’ deals whereby diners get a free starter, or sometimes even a starter and a glass of wine, with every main course ordered.

Tel Aviv Food I love Israeli food
Tel Aviv Food I love Israeli food

Here follows a collection of restaurants, divided into sections of Tel Aviv. Be aware, this collection covers less then one percent of the number of restaurants in Tel Aviv.


Center of Tel Aviv

Miznon (30 King George St; pittas 23-44NIS; noon-1am Sun-Thu, to 3pm Fri, from 7pm Sat) Map.
The vibe here is bustling, the prices are (very) reasonable and the staff are young, friendly and full of energy. And let’s not forget the most important thing – the food is exceptionally delicious. Huge pitas stuffed with your choice of veggies, chicken, offal or meat await, as do fish and chips or roasted spiced yam and cauliflower (yum!). You’ll need to line up to order and give your name. Then make your choice from the tahina, labneh, green chilli sauce and pickle spread, claim a seat and wait for your order to be announced. Drinks include lemonade, beer and arak.

Miznon
Miznon

Felafel Gabai (25 Bograshov St; felafel 16NIS; 10.30am-10.30pm Sun-Thu) Map.
In a city where every felafel stall claims to be the best, Gabai is a strong contender for the title. Like most stalls, its crispy balls of felafel come with as much salad, pickles and tahina sauce as you can squeeze in a pita bread. It also serves a fine shakshuka and schnitzel.

Felafel Gabai
Felafel Gabai

Sabich Frishman (42 Frishman St; sabich 18NIS; 9am-11.30pm Sun-Thu, Fri before Shabbat, Sat after Shabbat) Map.
This tiny stall specializes in sabich, an Iraqi-derived snack consisting of fried aubergine, boiled egg, cabbage, salad, potato, hummus and spicy amba (mango) sauce, all stuffed into a pita. It’s on the corner of Dizengoff and Frishman Sts – just look for the long lines and the felafel stall next door.

Sabich Frishman
Sabich Frishman

HaKosem (1 Shlomo HaMelech St; felafel from 18NIS; 10.30am-11.30pm Sun-Thu, to 3pm Fri) Map.
One of the friendliest felafel stalls in town, HaKosem (the Magician) is a popular snack stop on the corner of King George St. Aside from its trademark green, fried chickpea balls in pita, it also offers sabich, schnitzel and shwarma (meat sliced off a spit and stuffed in a pocket of pita-type bread with chopped tomatoes and garnish). If you’re lucky, you’ll get a free felafel ball straight from the pan while you queue: magic.

HaKosem
HaKosem

Gala Gelateria (30 King George St; 1/2/3 scoops 14/19/23NIS; 10am-1am) Map.
Special choices for vegans (including a chocolate concoction) plus plenty of yoghurt and fruit options make this hole-in-the-wall gelateria opposite Gan Meir Park stand out from the Tel Aviv pack. We recommend anything with pistachio, tahina or mango in it.

Gala Gelateria
Gala Gelateria

Orna and Ella (03-525 2085; http://www.ornaandella.com; 33 Sheinken St; breakfast 36-58NIS, mains 42-92NIS; 8.30am-midnight Sun-Thu, from 10am Fri & Sat) Map.
Effortlessly melding its serious gastronomic focus with a casual-chic decor and a neighborhood vibe, this restaurant-cafe is beloved of locals for good reason. Seasonal, often organic, ingredients are used to excellent effect in hearty breakfasts and refined lunches and dinners. Vegans, vegetarians and anyone who appreciates good food will be very happy here. Dine inside, or in a rear courtyard.

Orna and Ella
Orna and Ella

Brasserie M&R (03-696 7111; http://www.brasserie.co.il; 70 Ibn Gabirol St; breakfast 22-49NIS, mains 62-110NIS; 24hr) Map.
Somewhat officious maîtres d’ orchestrate the service at this hugely popular cafe-brasserie opposite Rabin Sq. The art deco–inspired interior is très Parisian, as is the menu, which includes choices such as oysters, salads, steaks and a plat du jour. There are plenty of French wines to choose from, but many diners opt for an expertly made cocktail instead.

Brasserie M&R
Brasserie M&R

Cafe Noah (93 Ahad Ha’am St; breakfast 36NIS, sandwiches 35NIS; 8am-11pm Sun-Thu, to 5pm Fri) Map.
Popular with writers, poets, pundits and other folk desperately attempting to avoid a nine-to-five job, Noah has big windows, a small library and a palm-tree-shaded terrace. The menu offers salads, sandwiches and all-day breakfasts.

Cafe Noah
Cafe Noah

Agadir Burger (www.agadir.co.il; 2 Nahalat Binyamin St; burgers from 49NIS; noon-4am Sun-Thu, to 5am Fri, to 3am Sat) Map.
Locals swear by the burgers here, which feature beef or vegetarian patties of varying sizes sizzled up with choose-your-own toppings. The perfect place to indulge a beer-and-burger craving, it’s on Nahalat Binyamin St and is always busy.

Agadir Burger
Agadir Burger

Fresh Kitchen (03-529 2687; http://www.freshkitchen.co.il; 37 Basel St; salads from 36NIS; 11.30am-midnight Sat-Thu, noon-5pm Fri) Map.
With over a dozen types of salad on the menu, this is the place to get your daily five portions of greens and then some. The menu also has a multitude of muesli, sandwiches and refreshing shakes –and it even lists the calories. There are a few branches dotted around town, including another in the city center.

Fresh Kitchen
Fresh Kitchen

Tchernihovsky 6 (03-620 8729; 5 Tchernichovsky St; mains 68-110NIS; noon-11.45pm Mon-Thu, 10am-noon Fri,10.30am-5pm Sat, 11.45am-6pm Sun) Map.
A little taste of Lisbon here in the Middle East, Tchernihovsky 6 is owned and operated by a Portuguese-Israeli chef and is known for dishes featuring octopus, pulses, meats and other Iberian favorites. There’s a street-side terrace that’s invariably packed on warm evenings. The same crew operates the Porto wine bar opposite.

Tchernihovsky 6
Tchernihovsky 6

South of Tel Aviv

Anita (crn Shabazi & Pines Sts, Neve Tzedek; 1/2/3 scoops 15/20/24NIS; 8am-midnight) Map.
Neve Tzedek’s ‘Mama of Gelato’ has a loyal local following, a fact that will immediately become apparent if you head here on a summer evening (expect a queue). Flavours are many and varied, and come in both sorbet and ice-cream styles. There’s a second branch opposite, and a third down the street that sells frozen yoghurt.

Anita
Anita

Bet Lehem Hummus (5 Florentin St, Florentin; hummus 17NIS; 10am-9pm) Map.
The free self-service tshai nana (mint tea) is a nice touch, but regulars are drawn here solely on the strength of the hummus. Choose from full (with mashed and spiced fava beans) or masabacha (with chickpeas and warm tahina) versions, and consider ordering an egg topping (2NIS).

Bet Lehem Hummus (5 Florentin St)
Bet Lehem Hummus (5 Florentin St)

Port Sa’id (Har Sinai St 5; small plates 22-52NIS, mains 34-180NIS; noon-late) Map.
The mother ship for inner-city hipsters, this restaurant-bar next to the Great Synangogue is decorated with a library of vinyl records on wooden shelves and has a coterie of heavily tattooed regulars. There’s good Middle Eastern–accented food on offer (no English menu, so you’ll need to consult with the waiters) and lots of drink choices. Get here early to score a table, and don’t expect much in terms of service.

Port Sa'id
Port Sa’id

North Abraxas (03-516 6660; 40 Lilienblum St; small plates 22-52NIS, mains 34-120NIS, pizza 54NIS; noon-midnight Sun-Thu, 1pm-midnight Fri & Sat) Map.
The food at this flamboyant place is relegated to secondary importance – here, it’s all about the vibe. Sitting at the bar and watching the chefs and waiters chop, flambée, plate, sing and down arak shots with customers is fabulous fun, and the modern Israeli menu with its pizzas, colorful vegetable dishes and flavorful slow-cooked meats will please most diners.

North Abraxas
North Abraxas

Nachmani (03-566 3331; http://noirgroup.co.il; 26 Nachmani St; pastries 12-16NIS, pizzas 46-58NIS, mains 58-134NIS; 8am-midnight Sun-Fri, from 9am Sat) Map.
A perfect example of the casual yet stylish eatery trending in Tel Aviv, this cafe-restaurant serves generous antipasto platters, piping-hot pizzas from its brick oven, handmade pasta dishes and an array of sandwiches and salads. The outdoor tables are popular between 4.30pm and 7pm on weekdays, when every alcoholic drink comes with a free focaccia or bruschetta.

Nachmani
Nachmani

Ouzeria (44 Matalon St, Florentin; mezes 35-60NIS; noon-midnight) Map.
Popular with locals of every age and style, this exuberant corner restaurant in the Levinsky Spice Market precinct is busy every night but is absolutely hopping on Friday after the market closes. It doesn’t accept bookings, so you may need to queue. Greek mezes showcase vegetables and seafood and are both tasty and well priced.

Ouzeria
Ouzeria

Ahathaan (03-560 8070; corner of Ahad Ha’am & Balfour Sts; breakfast 36-59NIS; 8am-midnight Sun-Thu, to 5.30pm Fri, 9am-midnight Sat) Map.
Shaded by an awning, lit by multicolored lights at night and inevitably full of locals, the street-side terrace at this thrift shop–chic cafe is a popular meeting point at any time of the day but is particularly busy in the morning. Inside, there are plenty of laptop-friendly tables catering to the telecommuting crowd.

Ahathaan
Ahathaan

Cafe Lucia (03-744 8088 ; 18 Balfour St; breakfast 10-46NIS, sandwiches 36-42NIS, mains 32-48NIS; 7am – midnight Sun-Thu, to Shabbat Fri, 7pm-midnight Sat ) Map.
Every neighborhood should have its own Cafe Lucia. Known for its breads and pastries (the owners also operate the Lachmanina Bakery), its shady street-side terrace is inevitably full of locals catching up over coffee and ordering from the well-priced menu, which is strong on comfort foods including sandwiches (fresh and toasted), schnitzels, pastas, meatballs and fish and chips.

Cafe Lucia
Cafe Lucia

Lulu (03-516 8793; http://www.lulucafe.co.il; 55 Shabazi St, Neve Tzedek; breakfast 38-58NIS, sandwiches 44-48NIS, mains 64-96NIS; 7.30am-11.30pm) Map.
A perfect example of Neve Tzedek’s laid-back but carefully curated style, this cafe-bar-restaurant has a vaguely arty ambience, Mediterranean menu and fashionable clientele. The food is a notch or two up the quality scale from standard cafe fare, and the indoor-outdoor seating arrangement suits all weather.

Lulu
Lulu

Meshek Barzilay (03-516 6329; http://www.meshekbarzilay.co.il; 6 Ahad Ha’am St, Neve Tzedek; breakfast 38-64NIS, mains 46-68NIS; 7am-4pm Sun, to midnight Mon-Fri, from 9am Sat) Map.
Vegetarians and vegans are well catered for in Tel Aviv, but this place goes that extra mile when it comes to making them happy. One of only two restaurants we found serving organic free-range eggs (bravo!), it has plenty of interesting Indian- and Asian-influenced dishes on its menu and some great breakfast choices. Regulars swear by the vegan farm breakfast.

Meshek Barzilay
Meshek Barzilay

Giraffe (03-685 1155; cnr Montefiore & Yavne Sts; mains 51-98NIS; noon-midnight) Map.
Robustly flavored pan-Asian dishes including dumplings, noodles and sushi rolls are served at this bustling branch of the popular local chain. The food lacks finesse, but it’s fresh and tasty. Despite being ever-busy, the friendly waiters and bar staff are always happy to have a chat. giraffe

Suzanna (03-944 3060; http://www.suzana.rest-e.co.il; 9 Shabazi St, Neve Tzedek; breakfast 49NIS, meals 55-86NIS; 10am-2am) Map.
A longstanding Neve Tzedek favorite, Suzanna offers a Middle Eastern mix of dishes. Some of these are more successful than others, so the ‘I’ll have what they’re having’ approach pays off here. Enjoy your meal during summer months on the large open courtyard in the shade of an enormous ficus tree.

Suzanna
Suzanna

Nanuchka (03-516 2254; http://nanuchka-tlv.com/; 30 Lilienblum St; mains 49-68NIS; noon-late) Map.
A vegan Georgian restaurant? Surely not. But that is indeed what Nanuchka – once a traditional Georgian eatery – has transformed itself into. We’re puzzled as to the place’s popularity, as our meals have been bland and uninteresting, but there’s a bohemian buzz about the place that may provide an explanation. The starter of seven salads (58NIS) is a safe bet.

Nanuchka
Nanuchka
Thai House
Thai House

Thai House (03-517 8568; http://www.thai-house.co.il; 8 Bograshov St; mains 42-128NIS; noon-11pm) Map.
Dedicated restaurants serving Thai food are few and far between in Tel Aviv. So if you’re craving green, yellow or red curry, try a dinner at Thai House (Beit Thailandi), a bamboo-laden restaurant on the corner of Ben Yehuda and Bograshov Sts.

Catit (03-510 7001; http://www.catit.co.il; 57 Nahalat Binyamin St; 3/4/5 courses 349/399/479NIS; 6.30-11pm Sun-Fri) Map.
Meir Adoni is generally acknowledged to be be Tel Aviv’s most exciting and accomplished chef, and this intimate restaurant is his flagship restaurant (he also operates the attached Mizlala bistro and two venues at the Carleton Hotel). The food here is spectacular – ultra-refined dishes that are wonderful to look at and even better to eat. Service is impressive, too. Vegetarians and vegans should mention their requirements when booking.

Catit
Catit

Bindella Osteria & Bar (03-650 0071; http://www.bindella.co.il; 27 Montefiore St; pasta 49-99NIS, mains 68-128NIS; 12.30pm-late) Map.
Bindella is the epitome of a modern Tuscan ristorante – elegant, with an uncompromising focus on quality food, wine and service. Our meals here have been exemplary, featuring al dente pasta, meat and fish cooked simply so as to showcase its quality, and delectable desserts. The wine list is similarly impressive, being full of premium Israeli and Italian drops.

Bindella Osteria & Bar
Bindella Osteria & Bar

Mizlala (03-566 5505; http://mizlala.co.il; 57 Nahalat Binyamin St; mains 89-169NIS; noon-midnight) Map.
Catit’s younger sibling has cheaper prices, a simpler menu and way more va-va-voom than her big sis but still showcases Meir Adoni’s refined approach to cooking. The stylish dining space with its long bar is most definitely one of the city’s places to be seen, and the menu’s Mediterranean slant is particularly pleasing. Whatever you do, don’t contemplate skipping dessert, because that’s the best of all in Tel Aviv. No, scrap that … the Middle East.

Mizlala
Mizlala

Café Noir (03-566 3018; http://noirgroup.co.il; 43 Ahad Ha’am St; brunch 34-64NIS, mains 66-128NIS; noon-midnight Sun-Wed, to 1am Thu, 8am-1am Fri, 9am-midnight Sat) Map.
This bustling French-style brasserie is known locally for two things: weekend brunches and its signature schnitzels. We’re big fans of the first but prefer to order one of the consistently excellent salads or pastas rather than the second. It’s worth paying extra for a bread basket.

Café Noir
Café Noir

Hotel Montefiore (03-564 6100; http://www.hotelmontefiore.co.il; 36 Montefiore St; burgers & sandwiches 42-46NIS, mains 62-160NIS; 7am-midnight) Map.
For a special night out, you need look no further than the Montefiore’s French-flavored restaurant. Though not quiet (the place is far too fashionable for that), it’s a favorite with glam young things out on dates and with business people sealing deals. The menu travels across Asia and Europe, the wine list is impressive and the bar is perfect for solo diners.

Hotel Montefiore
Hotel Montefiore

Dallal (03-510 9292; http://www.dallal.info; 10 Shabazi St, Neve Tzedek; breakfast 32-62NIS, mains 76-170NIS; 9am-11.30pm Sun-Fri, noon-11pm Sat ) Map.
For one of Tel Aviv’s best brunches, head here on Saturday between noon and 6pm, when the garden tables are full of locals noshing on organic egg dishes such as the roasted eggplant shakshuka with spinach, tomato coulis and goat yoghurt. Dinner in the slightly twee dining room is a more formal affair, featuring conservative French-influenced meat and fish dishes. The nearby Dallal Bakery (7 Kol Israel Haverim St, Neve Tzedek; 7am-10pm Sun-Thu, to 5pm Fri) Map. is a great spot for a simple lunch, but seating is extremely limited. If it’s full, consider ordering to go and heading to nearby Alma Beach for a picnic.

Dallal
Dallal

Tel Aviv Beach and Coast

Gelateria Siciliana (http://glideria.co.il; 110 Ben Yehuda St; 1/2/3 scoops 15/20/25NIS; noon-midnight Sun-Thu, 11amlate Fri & Sat) Map.
Most Italians will agree that the test of a good gelateria is always its pistachio gelato, which should be a soft green color and have a sweet yet nutty taste. Happily, Tel Aviv’s Gelateria Siciliana (map) passes this and other gelato-associated tests with flying colors. There’s a second branch near Rabin Sq (63 Ibn Gabirol St, map), and one in Herzliya.

Gelateria Siciliana
Gelateria Siciliana

Tamara (96 Ben Yehuda St; small/medium/large cup 22/27/32NIS; 9.30am-12.30am Sun-Fri, from 10.30am Sat) Map.
We’re going to break some bad news here: despite the spin, we suspect that frozen yoghurt isn’t particularly healthy. It’s undoubtedly delicious, though, so we’re all for damning the consequences and following the world-wide frozen-yogurt wave to this excellent place near Gordon Beach. Enjoy your cup plain or choose from a range of indulgent toppings.

Tamara
Tamara

Pinati (http://pinati.co.il/; 43 Bograshov St; hummus 20-33NIS; 10am-10pm Sun-Thu, to 4pm Fri ) Map.
Close enough to the beach that the picnic potential is obvious, this branch of Jerusalem’s favorite hummus joint sells hummus, chicken schnitzels and other fast-food favorites.

Pinati
Pinati

Benedict (www.benedict.co.il; 171 Ben Yehuda St; breakfasts 38-98NIS; 24hr) Map.
Those craving blueberry pancakes, bacon and eggs, shakshuka or eggs benedict at five in the afternoon – or, for that matter, in the morning – need go no further than this constantly crowded all-night breakfast place. Bring a big appetite: servings are huge, and come with bread. There’s another branch in Tel Aviv (29 Rothschild Blvd) and one in Herzliya.

Benedict
Benedict

Shila-Sharon Cohen’s Kitchen  (03-522 1224; http://www.shila-rest.co.il; 182 Ben Yehuda St; tapas 46-59NIS, raciones 48-79NIS, mains 74-148NIS; noon-1am Sun-Thu & Sat ) Map.
Only a castanet click or two away from the beach, Sharo Cohen’s Spanish-inspired seafood restaurant offers an array of vividly colored and robustly flavored tapas, raciones (small plates) and grilled main courses – those in the know tend to start with a few carpaccio and tartar tapas and then graze on the vegetable, fish and seafood raciones on offer.

Shila-Sharon Cohen's Kitchen
Shila-Sharon Cohen’s Kitchen

Manta Ray (03-517 4773; http://www.mantaray.co.il; southern Tel Aviv Promenade; breakfast 39-45NIS, mains 75-175NIS; 9am-11pm) Map.
It’s stylish, casual and at the beach – the perfect Tel Avivian triumvirate. On the slope directly above Alma Beach, this is the summer breakfast and lunch venue of choice for locals and tourists alike, so be sure to book (specify an outside table with a view). Try an omelette at breakfast and fish at other times of the day.

Manta Ray
Manta Ray

Herbert Samuel (03-516 6516; http://www.herbertsamuel.co.il; 6 Kaufmann St, Neve Tzedek; business lunch 88NIS, pasta 88-98NIS, mains 112-168NIS; 12.30-11.30pm) Map.
Home turf for Master Chef Israel judge Yonatan Roshfeld, this upmarket choice offers refined Mediterranean dishes from a menu that changes daily. Surrounds are elegant, with sea views. Come for the two-course business lunch, which is available every day except Saturday and represents good value.

Herbert Samuel
Herbert Samuel

Jaffa

Ali Caravan (1 HaDolphin St; hummus portions 18NIS; 8am-3pm Sun-Fri;) Map.
If hummus is a religion, then this could well be its Mecca. This tiny restaurant near Jaffa Port offers a limited menu of three hummus choices: plain, full (with mashed and spiced fava beans) or masabacha (with chickpeas and warm tahina). It’s always busy, so you’ll probably need to queue.

Ali Caravan
Ali Caravan

Shafa Bar (Rabbi Nachman St 2, Jaffa; sandwiches 32NIS, mains 28-52NIS; 9am-late) Map.
Another hipster hangout (Jaffa is full of them), Shafa is our favorite of the flea-market cafe-bar hybrids, a place where the coffee machine and cocktail shaker get an equal workout, and where it’s possible to order everything from a simple sandwich to a crunchy Thai salad or a dude-food choice such as Irish sausages and fries.

Shafa Bar
Shafa Bar

Said Abu Elafia & Sons (7 Yefet St, Jaffa; pastries from 3NIS; 24hr) Map.
Jaffa’s first bakery was established in 1880, and four generations down the line the Abu Elafia family is busier than ever. The main attractions are its giant sambusas (filled pastries), bourekas (stuffed breads with sheep’s cheese) and a unique Arab oven-baked pizza-like concoction filled with eggs, tomato, cheese and olives. Take-out only. Members of the family run branches near Rabin Sq (73 Ibn Gabirol St) Map. and on the esplanade (center Herbert Samuel Esplanade & Yonah HaNavi St) Map.

Said Abu Elafia & Sons
Said Abu Elafia & Sons

 

Dr Shakshuka (http://shakshuka.rest.co.il; 3 Beit Eshal St, Jaffa; shakshuka 36-42NIS, couscous 42-58NIS, shwarma 48-58NIS; 8am-midnight Sun-Fri) Map.
Set in an atmospheric Ottoman-era building in the flea market, the doctor has been working his shakshuka magic since 1991 and shows no sign of giving up. The eponymous egg dish is great, of course (his secret is loads of spice, particularly paprika), but locals tend to prefer the shwarma and couscous. Dine inside or in the shaded courtyard.

Dr Shakshuka
Dr Shakshuka

Puaa (03-682 3821; http://www.puaa.co.il; 8 Rabbi Yohanan St; breakfast 38-48NIS, sandwiches 38NIS, mains 42-58NIS; 9am-1am Sun-Fri, from 10am Sat) Map.
The thrift shop–chic decor is truly authentic here – every piece of furniture and decorative knicknack is for sale. In the midst of the flea-market action, laid-back Puaa serves an all-day breakfast and is particularly busy on weekends, when the shakshuka, sabich and bundash (fried challah served with jam and halva or with sour cream and cucumber) are must-order treats.

Puaa
Puaa

El Jamila (03-550 0042; 4 Olei Zion St, Jaffa; mains 60-120NIS; noon-midnight) Map.
Traditional fish dishes from the Ajami district are on offer at this Arab-run restaurant in the flea market. The stone-walled dining space has a high ceiling and attractive tiled floor, and is a lovely place to park your shopping bags after a busy morning in the souq. Try the ta’ashima (fish fillets baked in dough and served with almond tahina).

El Jamila
El Jamila

Container (03-683 6321; http://www.container.org.il; Warehouse 2, Jaffa Port; pasta & risotto 68-118NIS, seafood mains 68-118NIS; noon-late Sun-Thu, from 10am Fri & Sat) Map.
Equal parts restaurant, late-night bar, club and art space, the port’s most popular venue serves a mix of mezes, seafood, pasta and Israeli-style brunches. Like the food, the music is fusion, with well known local DJs spinning world, dub and dance. There are live sets on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday after 10pm.

Container
Container

Kalimera Bar & Restaurant (03-682 3232; http://www.kalimera.co; Jaffa Port; mains 68-118NIS; h5pm-late Sun-Wed, noon-late Thu-Sat) Map.
With its Greek island–style decor and menu, Kalimera is the perfect choice for a laid-back summer meal. Order an array of vegetable and seafood meze dishes to share, set the kids up with something from the children’s menu and prepare to enjoy yourselves.

Kalimera Restaurant
Kalimera Restaurant

Arad, the Town where there is nothing to do, except …

Arad
Arad

A popular base for those visiting nearby Masada, Arad sits on a high plateau between Be’er Sheva and the Dead Sea. There are no sights worthy of mention in the town. With other words, when you’re looking for a place to eat or sleep when you’re visiting the Dead Sea, this is the town for you. Map.

Tel Arad National Park (057 776 2170; http://www.parks.org.il; adult/student/child 15/13/7NIS; h8am-4pm Sat-Thu year-round, 8am-3pm Fri Apr-Sep, 8am-2pm Fri Oct-Mar)
The remains of two ancient settlements can be found at this archaeological site 13km northwest of the modern city of Arad. The lower city was inhabited in the Early Bronze Age (3150–2200 BCE) and the upper city was first settled in the Israelite period (1200 BCE). Highlights include the remains of an Israelite temple. To reach the site from Arad, take Hwy 31 and turn right (north) at the Tel Arad junction onto Hwy 80 (direction: Jerusalem).

Tel Arad National Park
Tel Arad National Park

Sleeping & Eating

Blau Weiss Youth Hostel (02-594 5599; arad@iyha.org.il; 34 Atad St; dm/s/d 150/355/450NIS)
From the outside, this recently refurbished IYHA-affiliated hostel resembles an army barracks. But inside, the 53 clean and comfortable rooms are set within a lush and attractive garden. All have fridge, kettle and cable TV. To get here, walk east from the bus station up Yehuda St, turn right into HaPalmach St and then left at the skate park.And I know, because I visited and slept there.

Yehelim (052 652 2718, 077 563 2806; http://www.yehelim.com; 72 Moav St; d 850-950NIS, f 1200NIS, ste 1500-1800NIS)
A recent renovation and expansion of this family-friendly hotel has certainly raised the bar in the Arad accommodation stakes – nothing else even comes close in the areas of comfort and style. Located on the residential edge of town, it has 15 large rooms with cable TV and a kettle; suites sport a spa bath and coffee machine. But I hit my head again on that sealing.

Yehelim
Yehelim

Kaparuc’hka (08-860 6615; 19 Ahwa St; pizzas 29-36NIS; 9am-9pm Sun-Thu, 9am-3pm Fri)
Travel writers tend to overuse the word ‘gem’, but here it really does apply. Opened in 2014, this tiny place is run by Lisa and Uriga, seasoned travelers and committed foodies, and it is far and away the best eating option in town. The limited menu includes an antipasti platter, caprese salad, pizzas, calzones and delicious home-made desserts and cakes. There’s a good range of imported beers, local wine and good espresso coffee to enjoy with your meal, and a choice of indoor and outdoor seating. To find it, head east along Elazar Ben Yair and turn right into Ahwa St after the park. And there is that excellent beer they serve. I mean I don’t like beer and can’t handle it, but when it’s hot, then beer it is. Better then cola with that weather.

Muza (08-997 5555; http://www.muza-arad.co.il; Rte 31; burgers 37-62NIS, pasta 42-52NIS; 8am-1am)
Decked out with team scarves and pennants from around the world, this big sports-oriented pub near the petrol stations serves huge plates of hearty food including burgers, pasta and sandwiches. The simplest dishes are the best choices, because when you choose something complicated, they will look at you with wide eyes and then you will be surprised by the result (which nobody will recognize as you intended).

Muza
Muza

How to come there?

Metropoline bus 388 travels frequently between the central bus terminal on Yehuda St in Arad and Be’er Sheva (19NIS, 40 minutes). Services operate from 6am to 11.40pm Sunday to Thursday, to 4.45pm on Friday and from 6.45pm on Saturday. Egged bus 384 links Arad with the main (eastern) entrance to Masada (one hour, three or four daily Sunday to Thursday, two on Friday).

To get to Masada’s western (Roman ramp) entrance and its sound-and-light show by car or taxi (day/night 120/150NIS), take Rte 3199 from the back of Arad. The drive takes approximately 30 minutes.

Jish, Catholic Town in the Golan, where they speak Aramaic

Jish town
Jish town

The only village in Israel with a Maronite (Eastern Catholic) majority, serene hillside Jish (population 3000) was settled by migrants from Lebanon in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today it is the site of a pioneering effort to revive the use of Aramaic, the language of Jesus and an important source of identity for Maronites. Most shops are closed on Sunday. Map.

Tomb of the Prophet Joel in Jish
Tomb of the Prophet Joel in Jish

During the Great Jewish Revolt (66–70 BCE), Jish – then, as now, known in Hebrew as Gush Halav – was the last place in the Galilee to fall to the Romans, according to Josephus Flavius.

Sights

Near the entrance to the village, you can visit a large, modern Maronite church and, across the street, the tombs of Shamaiya and Avtalion, Jewish sages who served on the Sanhedrin in Jerusalem during the 1st century BCE. In a small valley 800m east of the entrance to Jish, hikers can explore the remains of an ancient synagogue (3rd or 4th century CE) amid gorgeous fig and olive groves.

Coexistence Trail in Jish
Coexistence Trail in Jish

A paved, 2.5km hiking and cycling path known as the Coexistence Trail (wheelchair accessible) heads east from Jish, leading to Moshav Dalton via Dalton Reservoir. At local farms you can pick your own cherries (May), peaches (starting in June), raspberries (summer) and apples (late August to October).

Sleeping & Eating

Several area restaurants serve authentic Lebanese cuisine.

Ruah Glilit (052 281 0433; swojish@yahoo.com; d 500NIS)
George Samaan, a well-known oud, saz (a plucked string instrument) and violin player (you can see him on YouTube) who often appears with Ehud Banai, and his wife, Eva, offer guests a warm, musical welcome in a cozy sitting room outfitted with an upright piano, an old gramophone and a wood-burning stove. The three upstairs rooms feature wooden balconies and gorgeous views. It’s 600m up the main street from the entrance to town.

Misedet HaArazim (Wiam 054 552 5590; Rte 89; mains 45-98NIS; 10am-10pm or 11pm)
Scrumptious offerings include eight kinds of hummus, stuffed grape leaves (45NIS), grilled meats, shishbarak (meat dumplings in goat yoghurt sauce; 50NIS) and sheikh al-mahshi (zucchini stuffed with ground beef and lamb and cooked in yoghurt sauce; 55NIS). Situated at the entrance to Jish; the sign features a green cedar of Lebanon. A selection of two dozen different veggie salads costs 45NIS per person (35NIS if you also order a main dish; minimum two people). For dessert, try the chocolate shwarma (25NIS). I die for the desert. When I’m here with a group, I skip everything except the desert. Ha!

Baladna (04-699 1151; mains 40-80NIS; 10am-2am, closed Mon)
Ensconced in two 19th-century stone houses, this atmospheric restaurant specializes in authentic Galilee-style Arab cuisine, including shishbarak (40NIS) and dishes made with freekeh (roasted green wheat). Other offerings include pork schnitzel (50NIS) and seven cocktails (35NIS to 40NIS). It often has live music on Saturday night. Situated 600m up the main street from the town entrance.

Getting There & Away
Jish is 13km northeast of Tsfat, right where Rte 89 does a 90-degree turn. It is linked to Tsfat (20 minutes, every one or two hours) by buses 43 and 367; the latter also goes to Nahariya (45 minutes).

Wineries

Ramat Dalton

Ramat Dalton
Ramat Dalton

The area around Moshav Dalton, known as Ramat Dalton (Dalton Plateau), produces some highly regarded wines. Several wineries do their thing in the Ramat Dalton Industrial Park, 4km northeast of Jish on Rte 886.

Dalton Winery (%04-698 7683; http://www.dalton-winery.com; Ramat Dalton Industrial Park; admission 15NIS; 10am-4pm Sun-Thu, 10am-2pm Fri )
Using cabernet sauvignon, merlot, petit syrah, shiraz and zinfandel grapes, this winery produces about one million bottles a year. It has a log-cabin-style tasting centre across the car park from the modern production facilities. Offers 45-minutes tours (call ahead if you can), the last one hour before closing.

Dalton Winery
Dalton Winery

Adir Winery (04-699 1039; http://www.adir-winery.com; Ramat Dalton Industrial Park; 9am-5pm Sun-Thu, 9am-2pm or 3pm Fri, closes later in summer)
Inside the all-white visitors center, you can sample Adir’s award-winning wines (30NIS; free if you buy a bottle); production is just 100,000 bottles a year. Also has a cheese shop that serves sublime frozen yoghurt (8NIS to 32NIS depending on cup size). At the cafe, breakfast (130NIS for two), based on goat’s cheeses, is served from 9am to 3pm (to 1pm Fri).

Adir Winery
Adir Winery

Food!

Nalchik (04-699 0548; Rehaniya; dishes 25-35NIS; noon-8pm daily)
This unpretentious, family-run restaurant is a great place to try dishes brought from the North Caucasus by Circassian refugees in the 1870s. The village of Rehaniya is 4.5km north of the Dalton Industrial Park; from Rte 886, follow Nalchik’s white, black and red signs (in Hebrew). Specialities include majmak (lentil paste, eaten with pita), shush barak (ground-meat-filled dumplings served in light tomato soup), k’ulak’ (chickpea-filled dumpling served with yoghurt), haloj (pastry filled with Circassian cheese and deep-fried in olive oil) and mataza (dumplings  filled with Circassian cheese and green onions and served with yoghurt).

The Tour from Hell

This tour was the tour from hell … for me. For the group absolutely not, because they had loads of fun, costing me my hair of course. We are talking about a tour, which shows what Israel actually is, a mixture of culture, adventure, exploration and Israeli sights in all the major touristic centers of Israel. This article is part of the Tour Guide Diaries September 2016.

I’m working on whole range of new tours, like the so called low-budget tours and the tours, which mixes several things together in a more exciting tour then currently exists, and this tour is one of them (for example, we go on concert in the evening, visit festivals, workshops, join even a work camp to dig into the ground with the archeologists, visit the sights, do a little gem-touring, etc.). We were out for 12 days, our group was 50 (originally 30) strong from all over the United States, ages were between 17 and 63, and the group arrived at the airport 13 days ago (from the date of publishing)(so I’m recovering already for three days).

Welcome to Israel from the Ben Gurion Airport
Welcome to Israel from the Ben Gurion Airport

We went to the airport in a very good mood, I had my junior guides with me (Igor and Lena or together “the Juniors”), our new bus and the driver with the nickname “the Beast” (he’s small and overly polite and never shows any emotion, so his nickname is “the Beast” and his real name is Eddie) to pickup our new group for our new mixture tours.

One thing about nicknames! I really didn’t gave them their nicknames. I’ve no nickname … except ‘the Sheik’, because of some small misunderstanding last August, where some Bedouin men on the goat market of Be’er Sheba were advising me to take ten women as wives to drink coffee with me, but nobody remembers that, thank goodness for that.

I double checked my nice, sign-board (so people know it’s us) I was holding with our names on it to welcome our group. I really don’t want to repeat that prank from the last time where the driver changed the text into “Here’s the Idiot” or something like that. The board covered our names nicely.

When the people started to stream out of the checkout I held up my board and voila! People noticed and streamed to us with smiles on their faces. I spoke before their flight with them in a conference call over the Internet and I’m happy they were in such a good mood.

Hi Sheik! How are you?!” one yelled cheekily with a big grin on his face (someone has been talking)! And soon we were almost overwhelmed with the thirty people … and some … more? We moved our group from the hall to let them drink something and have maybe a bite to eat, but I realized that the group was much larger then 30! I was already upset about the Sheik thing and now this. Maybe some people they met during their flight? The Juniors were already suspiciously grinning.

It turned out that at the last moment they found more people who wanted to join this tour, but ‘forgot’ to tell me. So, suddenly instead of 30 people, we have now 45 people! And not to forget the payments. And the reservations. And the bus! And my heart! And what’s left of my hair! And not to forget my blood pressure.

You know, I’m just 56 years old and I’m old man and it’s really in those times that I’m thinking about going on pension. Maybe a pension on an island somewhere with nobody else then my wife. Well … when my wife comes with me, then she wants her cats also to come with us. And her aquarium with those bl**dy fish too. And the kids too and they have dogs.

I suddenly realize that we have a problem. The hotel reservation with our hotel is in Jerusalem and I know that they have no additional place; they are booked full (they had place for us of course, but with 30 people, not 45). One of my Juniors grabbed my hand, which was busy to pull out my hair (not joking). While the group was amusing themselves, five more people came in to join the group (they said ‘sorry, we’re late’, carrying large boxes with toys they bought at Duty Free). That’s 50!

I called a colleague, who must find us a hotel in or near Jerusalem, who can place a group of 53 people that same day. In high season! I quickly broke the connection with the swearing colleague (he’s called ‘The Pipe’, because he smokes … guess what? Correct, large cigars).

Feeling better, I processed the extra people, gave a pep talk to the Juniors and moved the army … eh … group to the Beast (to our bus). The poor man’s face lit up when he saw us coming. When the people started to enter his bus, slowly his expression turned from happy into confused … then shocked and was trying to find me … only I was at a safe distance looking at the scene and waiting for the expected eruption of ‘the beast’ soon to be … erupting.

‘The Beast’ came out of his bus and walked straight at me. I pointed at the Juniors with my thumb and blamed them for the problem of overcrowding his new and shiny bus. Before the juniors could react and recover from the shock, I was already moving quickly into the bus to tackle the next problem. That’s called strategical thinking. I don’t remember who advised something like that, but what I do remember was the advise “… never admit you’re wrong, always blame the one next to you …”. It never works with my wife though.

So in the bus, I started to bring the problem in front of our group. They came up right before they left to Israel with an additional 20 people for the group without telling us and we have only reservations for 30 people and the hotel is booked full. There will be no chance in hell that we would find another hotel for 50 people  within a couple of hours, then maybe a beach … but no beach in Jerusalem. And not to forget the damage for the hotel if we cancel at the last moment, the money would not be returned and the tour would be more expensive for all of us.

So the group decided that they would room together for this night. Not that they cared, because it was a rowdy group, who would be visiting a pop-concert that night after dinner in the old city and I saw already several girls checking out several gents. I felt my blood pressure going up when I also saw the expression of several of the people of this group who were already grinning mischievously.

During our talk, my disgruntled Juniors were already in the bus and my driver in his place. When he started the motor, I could hear how upset he was. The bus is exactly for 53 people and we always have a golden rule to have a larger bus then we there are people in the group. Well, technically we still have (three reserve places), but it was not ideal. They will suffer during the tour.

While we were on our way to Jerusalem, I got a phone call with a swearing Pipe (the guide my age checking out hotels) and he said he moved the reservations to another hotel the days after for 52 people and claimed that I could sleep outside and hung up. Funny boy. Oof. Two things down. Now a bigger bus and that would be even perfect. So instead of chatting with ‘the Beast’ myself, I sent him a SMS. Much more manly, not? I could have sent the Juniors, but they were angry at me for some reason.

American Colony Hotel
American Colony Hotel

All went well during our trip to our hotel in Jerusalem. We only had four bathroom stops, so nothing more then normal in such situation (never happened like that, but who cares at that point). We arrived at last at the American Colony Hotel.

We all got out of our bus and we moved into our hotel, with a smiling hotel manager who was looking at us happily and welcomed us in Israel with open arms. That continued – smiling and all – until he realized that there were not 30 of us, but the whole “g&^^%^$^%$%#$%d” US army!  Suddenly he was not smiling anymore and I saw him already looking for me. The cowards of a Juniors ran already in the hotel, so I was forced to confront the manager myself.

After calming the manager down (and pay a fortune to do that), he clearly didn’t care anymore to welcome us to his hotel, he disappeared posthaste. After everyone was checked in, and disappeared into the hotel, I could sit in one of those easy sofas at last.

That evening I discovered that I forgot to check myself in. “Well, sorry, no place!” But I arranged a bigger bus (the bus was called Fat Bertha, like that super gun), the Beast was happy again. The Juniors were alright after they found out I slept on the sofa. What else? Oh yes. One woman hurt her foot during wild dancing (is the Polkas a dance?), another one discovered that she’s pregnant, one man thought he lost his way and was in the wrong hotel, while he was wandering around at the back of our hotel and we experienced yesterday evening an example what Israeli rock sounded.

The concert hall was a cafe and the rock turned out to be House Music, but that was really great and everyone danced and had fun. They didn’t want to go back to the hotel at the end, but the bouncers almost kicked us out. We took Fat Bertha and went back to our hotel, still singing and dancing.

I had pain in my head and my back was hurting because of sleeping on the sofa. The Juniors had fun and were in a good mood, the Beast was still polishing Fat Bertha and our group was in a super good mood after a great breakfast (I ate chips). At the end we moved into Fat Bertha and drove to the Jerusalem markets and shopping streets. Why? We rented off a restaurant for the day, where everyone could demonstrate that they wanted to cook and we suppose to eat what the volunteers would prepare for us. The Chef of the restaurant refused to allow us ‘barbarians‘ in his kitchen alone, so he would stand guard (in the middle of his kitchen).

I skip a couple days of the tour and move to the 5th day, the day that we go to Be’er Sheba. But one more remark about the cooking in the restaurant. It was so much fun and we ate so well that evening after loads of shopping (we went back three times to the market and it was a fortune what they bought). The group didn’t burn down his kitchen nor the restaurant! And the cook hid the large knifes for some reason.

We arrived at our usual hotel in Be’er Sheba. Be’er Sheba is a very nice place, but the choice in hotels is limited and they can’t be compared with the hotels in Eilat, Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. But this Be’er Sheba hotel would do. And who was there waiting for us while we were checking in the hotel? Right, the same worried looking manager from last August, who was confronted with the fact that there were two small goats running rampage in his hotel in the middle of the night in August and one totally destroyed (or better eaten) room.

Bedouin Goat Market
Bedouin Goat Market

The manager didn’t look pleased. He asked me though if we plan to go to the goat market today. Of course we would go to the goat market and not to forget the chicken market too. And this time I arranged also a small tour on camels and we would maybe see a small auction of buying and selling camels (and we have also chicken speed running organized). I told him that, and he really didn’t look pleased. I guaranteed him that we this time inspect everyone coming in and out of the bus for hidden goats, chickens and camels. The only thing he said was that he would do the same when we would come back to the hotel.

I was happy at that time, because we would only stay one night at his hotel, before we would spent two days in the desert with carts and camels. I really didn’t look forward to meet Fred the Camel again, so I could avoid having a camel tour in Eilat.

Market in Be’er Sheba
Market in Be’er Sheba

We indeed went to the markets in Be’er Sheba (the normal one, and the goat and chicken markets). Nothing exciting happened, except that our group was very hard to keep together (50 rowdy people in a very good mood with loads of energy) with three guides (the Juniors and I). We didn’t pickup any other group, they didn’t buy any goats or chickens, nobody got upset, but there were some people who bought some strange Bedouin dresses for women for some reason. We also tried the camels. That was so much fun that others have problems climbing on camels like I usual have. But no auction of camels, otherwise I could change my Juniors for a camel or three goats maybe, damn that manager.

Bedouin Goat Market
Bedouin Goat Market

We met those same Bedouin men who were asking about my 10 women and again explained to the group that I’ve a harem and 20 children, but I got my coffee. That reminded me about ordering the evening amusement and this time we had real Bedouin musicians not such phony flop of a so called d^&&*^*%&^$%^ magician and his sexy belly dancer like back in August during the goat disaster. The Juniors were giggling! I was highly suspicious seeing that, but at that moment my attention was drawn to my camel, who was trying to bite me. All camels in the world only try to bite me and nobody else.

In the evening back to the hotel, we met the manager, who was indeed inspecting everyone (I forgot to check anyone for hidden goats, chickens and camels), but he obviously not. After that, he insisted in inspecting Fat Bertha and when The Beast finally understood what the manager wanted, they together almost tore the bus apart for their ridiculous quest for goats, chickens and camels! Honestly, who do they think we are?

That evening there was no original Bedouin music, but that belly dancer and her bl**dy so called magician who was loudly calling me “The Sheik” again. I will get my revenge on my Juniors for that!

But thank goodness, I slept wonderful (even when the Beast was snoring loudly), no goats on the rampage, but I heard in the morning that the manager couldn’t sleep all night.

Ramon Crater
Ramon Crater

The next day we visited the Ramon Crater and met our Bedouins. Guess who? My old Bedouin man and his many children and camels and … Fred the Camel. Fred the Camel was the camel only for me, according the Bedouin. Damn him and his camel. The same for the Juniors. I will cook them and feed them to Fred the camel. Never met something so smelly and with such awful sounds he makes when he sees me. Always in a bad mood too. And he bites. And tries to throw me off when I finally manage to climb on his back.

Experience Eilat's Mountains

We moved to the desert with the group on the back of the camels. I knew that the Bedouin with his many children were waiting somewhere with jeeps. They suppose to pick us up tomorrow evening for a big party with the Bedouins. That evening we finally could sleep at 3 am, after I translated again the campfire stories of the old Bedouin. Instead of his usual horror theme, he was telling about the old caravans of ancient times, who were stranded in the middle of the desert and were forced to eat their own camels … and scorpions and other insects to survive.

Experience Eilat's Mountains

I changed the story and translation somewhat (the man speaks only Arabic) and told the group that camel meat tasted just like what we all ate that evening (we ate lamb). The woman who discovered (at the beginning of the tour) that she was pregnant started to puke and the Bedouin who didn’t understand English was looking at me and pointed threatening at Fred the camel and shook slowly his head, frowning and all that jazz.

So he was telling another story about the young Bedouin woman, who fell in love with a boy her age from another tribe, while her father promised her to someone else (three times her age). He translated dutifully, but every time I wanted to make his story sound more … juicy (?), the old Bedouin man (who didn’t understand English?) was pausing and frowning at me. No fun like that.

Under the stars of the desert, it would quiet anyone, so impressive it was. The old Bedouin suddenly had deep knowledge of the stars and demonstrated it. He was trying to explain to us how you could navigate in the desert and with only the stars.

The next morning was a disaster. Fred the camel managed to bite me straight in my behind and couldn’t sit very well any more after that. According Junior, Fred’s teeth were visible for days after that. It seems to be funny for the group though.

Eilat
Eilat

When we finally arrived at our hotel in Eilat, I could find relieve there. For whatever reason, the group tipped the Bedouin man extra! Not fair. They can’t handle some teasing? Especially when everyone was calling me Sheik.

Hilton Eilat Queen Of Sheba Hotel
Hilton Eilat Queen Of Sheba Hotel

I skip the tour here to the tenth day and we are in Jericho. Until then we survived, we didn’t pick additional guests up in our group, we didn’t loose anyone, neither additional goats or any other animals, my behind was alright again and could sit (tenderly). We still were using Fat Bertha the bus and the Beast our driver was still happy. I couldn’t exchange my juniors for camels or goats, so they were still there, looking wearily at me when I could prank them back.

Tel al-Sultan near Jericho
Tel al-Sultan near Jericho

But now we arrived in Jericho and that’s a special place in Israel. Not only it’s the oldest place you can find anywhere in Israel and surroundings, but also very mysterious. There were so many cultures and civilizations arriving and disappearing in Jericho over the many thousands of years, nobody really could even count them. There are hundreds of layers of different buildings built once in Jericho and the archeologists are still counting.

The Canaan were a bunch of wild people, who believed in all kind of gods, who are now classified as demons or devils. So everyone was interested in my horror stories and that I did. So they were already in the proper mood for the Mount of Temptation!

Mount of Temptation
Mount of Temptation

Then we came to the Mount of Temptation near Jericho, where everyone was highly impressed about my strange stories. They wanted to see proof and so we did. We didn’t take the cable cars but walked and climbed the mountain.

Mount of Temptation, the mountain and the monastery
Mount of Temptation, the mountain and the monastery

Half way some people were murmuring something bad of course, until we reached the promised caves and showed them the scratches the devil once had made thousands of years ago, when Jesus was tempted by the same devil to make bread from stone. I showed them the caves of the hermits of old, who dedicated their lives to live there and to pray, never talked to anyone else anymore for more then 40 years.

Or the Hermit who became mad after seven years in a narrow cave and who received food from people from Jericho. He became too fat to exit his cave and he died there. His spirit still haunts the cave, some believe.

Mount of Temptation, inside in the monastery
Mount of Temptation, inside in the monastery

When we finally arrived at the Monastery, everyone was looking a bit sketchy, especially my two Juniors. The Monastery is amazing where you can see the personal cells of the Monks still working there. It’s still not too late to allow the Juniors to dump them there for some month or so, I was joking of course, but one Junior thought I meant it. Ha!

At day 12 we said good bye to everyone. All went well after the disasters at the beginning when suddenly our group grew from 30 till 50. Nobody bought or smuggled any goat or camel, nobody destroyed or ate a room, I got finally my revenge on my Juniors and I had one happy large group of people who felt bad that they needed to go home.

I still have my hair (mostly), I will not see Fred the camel for at least one week and I’m dead on my feet. Now I go back home to see if my wife is still there.

I also discovered that Eddie (‘The Beast’) decided to sleep in Fat Bertha his new bus when I finally came home. My wife hid my phone after that, so I could not help him out. I discovered the day after that he changed our old new bus with Fat Bertha and the bus company was not happy.