Useful information

On this page you find very useful information about Israel from the perspective of the tourist coming from outside Israel and for those who are living in Israel and like to ‘play’ the tourist. This page is actually golden information for the ‘stranger’, because it summarises this site on one page.


Sections in this page

Click on one of the sections: Christian, Entertainment, Music, Hiking, Food, Maps, Markets, Museums, Sleeping, Touring

General information for the tourist

What to do ... what to do?
Photo by Toa Heftiba Şinca on Pexels.com
  • Are you coming to Israel? Read this first. When you plan to come to Israel, here are some golden tips, which might very likely save you some $$$$. And it also might save you time, misery and have a vacation, you’ll never forget, the best ever. And it’s also the way to use the resources of this site.
  • Brief history of Israel – for the visiting tourist.Before you visit the Holy Land or Israel, this is an article you need to read first. Here you can read the rough brief history of the lands of Israel and some background what’s going on currently in Israel.
  • Bedouins in Israel. Bedouins are Arabs and desert nomads who hail from and continue to live primarily in the Arabian peninsula and the Middle East and North Africa. They the have traditionally lived in the arid steppe regions along the margins of rain-fed cultivation. They often occupy areas that receive less than 5 centimeters of rain a year, sometimes relying on pastures nourished by morning dew rather than rain to provide water for their animals.
  • Cemeteries in Jerusalem Gallery. Here follows a set of photos about cemeteries you can find in Jerusalem. Because Jerusalem is a multi-cultural city, you see here also different cemeteries from the Jews, Muslims and Christians. If you want to visit the city and to get to know it very well, start with the cemeteries in the city. This is a quote from a visiting tourists from one of my groups.
  • Israel at a glance. This article is about Israel at a glance. Many tourists asked me where they suppose to go! Well, here is your oversight depending on your intentions and preferences. Some people love historical sights, others religious, cultures, hiking, family, cities, beaches, deserts and much more. If that is so, Israel is your excellent destination.
  • Israeli public transport. Yes, it’s possible to tour Israel with the help of public transportation. There is no tour company, which is offering this and many people think it’s not possible, uneasy, hard, difficult and more of that jazz. But honestly, it’s a question of the right planning, because the public transportation in Israel is really good.
  • Coming to Israel on a limited budget? It’s possible to visit Israel on limited budgets, but there is a certain minimum required, otherwise you starve! Anyway, it’s possible to enjoy visiting Israel with a daily budget of NIS 200 (or $53) per day. With that daily budget, you can get a 7 day vacation in Israel for NIS 1,400 (or $370).
  • Create your own itinerary part 1 and part 2. As a tour guide, I receive many questions from people, who are busy with the preparations for their vacation in Israel. And they are of course right, because a vacation in Israel from anyone not living in Israel is expensive and easily it will cost more then thousand dollars (per person) at least! And for the locals it’s the same. Israel is expensive (if you don’t know the places).
  • Jerusalem, the Holy City for billions around the world. Jerusalem is seen as a Holy City by billions of people all over the world. For the Jews, this city is the city King David made capital of his kingdom and where the temple stood with the Ark of the Covenant. For Christians, it’s where Christ died, buried and resurrected from the death. For the Muslims it’s holy because they believe Muhammad ascended to heaven from the Temple Mount. Click here for the maps of Jerusalem and the maps for Old Jerusalem (old city).
  • Hop-On-Hop-Off buses in Israel. A type of tourist bus or tram that follows a circular route with fixed stops through a city and that allows paying passengers unlimited travel for a day (or other period of time) with the freedom to disembark at any stop and reboard another bus or tram to continue their journey.
  • Transport in, to, from and near Eilat. For those who are visiting Eilat (or are going to do that) without plan (like most of you do), here are some tips for you to make your life a bit easier if you want to see something of Eilat. It’s the problem of getting there and how to move around and with what. Did you know that you can fly to Eilat instead of driving for 4 hours by car? Do you know how much that cost? It cost you $35 and 35 minutes. Voila, you earned your reading back with this.
  • Visas for Israel, Jordan and Egypt. In this article we describe the processes to get visas when you want to travel to Israel, Jordan, Egypt and lands under control of the Palestinian Authority. I think it’s good information to have when you plan to come to Israel, Jordan and Egypt, but please double check, because information in this article might not be accurate (anymore).
Go top


Christianity in Israel

Photo by sergio souza on Pexels.com
  • Church of St. Mary of Magdalene Gallery - An impressive gallery about the most amazing church in Jerusalem, the Church of St. Mary of Magdalene. Not only this church is so unbelievable beautiful, but the inside of the church is as well. And it's history is also very interesting.
  • Most beautiful Monasteries in Israel Gallery - Here you find a collection of images about monasteries in Israel. Many of those monasteries are located remote, some in the desert, others hidden away in quiet corners somewhere ...
  • Russian Orthodox Churches - Russia and Israel have a history and the Russian Orthodox church has a real history with Israel, as you can read here in this article about the Russian Orthodox Churches in Israel.
  • The History of the Christian Churches in Israel - An article about the history of the Christian churches in Israel. Because there are so many different groups of Christian churches, and Israel is seen as the central place for Christianity, they are all represented in this land. And because Israel is a democracy with the freedom of religion, and the churches choose to stay autonomous, who all share the holy places in the Holy Land, its history is long and complex.
  • Useful information - On this page you find very useful information about Israel from the perspective of the tourist coming from outside Israel and for those who are living in Israel and like to 'play' the tourist. This page is actually golden information for the 'stranger', because it summarises this site on one page.
  • Bethlehem - Bethlehem, is located at about 9km south of Jerusalem and is celebrated by billions of Christians all over the world as the birthplace of Jesus Christ. In Bethlehem, Mary gave birth to Jesus in a cave normally used for animals. Here the local shepherds came to worship the baby, and here the Three Wise Men from the east came to pay homage and present their gifts
  • Russian Compound - About 100 years ago, the Russian Compound served the needs of Russian pilgrims to the Holy Land, many of whom stayed in its hostels. That was good while it lasted; however, when World War I broke out, the Ottoman authorities expelled the Russians. Then, when the British captured the city, they used the area for various administrative offices.
  • Prepare for your Vacation in Israel – Create your own Itinerary, Part I - As a tour guide, I receive many questions from people, who are busy with the preparations for their vacation in Israel. And they are of course right, because a vacation in Israel from anyone not living in Israel is expensive and easily it will cost more then thousand dollars (per person) at least! And for the locals it's the same. Israel is expensive (if you don't know the places).
  • Russian Orthodox Ascension Church - The 64-metre tower that dominates the Mount of Olives skyline belongs to the Russian Orthodox Church of the Ascension. It was built to this height in the 1870s so that pilgrims unable to walk to the Jordan River could climb its 214 steps and at least see the river.
  • St. Abraham’s Monastery - In the past the Monastery belonged to the Ethiopians, however in 1660 it changed hands to the Greeks, as the Ethiopians were unable to pay their taxes to the Turkish Sultan. There is a large water pit under the church dating back to the Byzantine era, and on the roof is an olive tree that according to tradition is the tree to which the ram was tied during the sacrifice of Isaac by Abraham, from which the church takes its name.
  • Sisters of Zion Convent or Les Soeurs De Sion Monastery - Thousands of pilgrims each year walk under the Ecce Homo Arch near the beginning of the Via Dolorosa without realising that extensive remains of first-century Jerusalem lie beneath their feet. For centuries Christians believed the arch was the place where Pontius Pilate displayed Jesus — beaten, crowned with thorns and clothed in a purple robe — to a hostile Jerusalem crowd with the words: “Behold the man” (“Ecce Homo” in Latin)
  • St. Catherine’s Monastery – a Gem in the Egyptian Desert - The Orthodox establishment monastery holds the burning bush from which God first revealed himself to Moses. It also contains a treasure trove of icons, unique mosaic and ancient manuscripts. It's also one of the oldest Christian monasteries in the world and has been the center of monastic life in the southern Sinai.
  • Latrun Monastery - Monastery of the Silent Monks at Latrun. The site where the monastery of the silent monks stands today served as a way station for pilgrims from Yafo to Jerusalem in the 19th century. After being sold to the Order of Saint Benedict, the monastery known as the monastery of the silent monks was built in 1890, and until 1960 its articles included a vow to refrain from idle talk and to uphold silence at all times except during prayer. A large church and living quarters sit on the monastery grounds, with a beautiful garden and a modest the yard.
  • Spyridon Monastery - Spyridon Monastery is a Greek Orthodox Center of Jabsha St., near the Northern Wall St. Spyridon was a Cypriot bishop in the 4th century AD, whose embalmed corpse traveled to Constantinople and in the 15th century was returned to the island of Corfu. According to residents of Corfu, Spyridon saved the island four times: once from the Turks, once from hunger and twice from disease. Many believers come to the Corfu church to see the complete body displayed to the public for a few minutes each day and once a year his hearse is paraded on the island.
  • Mar Saba Monastery - The Greek Orthodox Mar Saba Monastery in the Judean Desert east of Bethlehem seems to hang precariously from the walls of the Kidron Valley. But it is as sturdy as the faith it represents: it was built some 1,500 years ago, and is one of the oldest still-inhabited monasteries in the world.
  • St. Theodosius Monastery - St. Theodosius Monastery, founded in 476, is about 12 km east of Bethlehem. This monastery was destroyed during the Persian invasion. The building that stands today was constructed by the Greek Orthodox Church and incorporates the remains of an old Crusader building and is inhabited by a dozen Greek Monks.
  • The Most Crazy History of Ancient Acco (Acre) - Acre, or Acco has really a crazy history and one of the many reasons for that is because Acre is so very old, continuously inhabited since the early Bronze Age (c. 2000-1550 BCE) some 4000 years ago. In Egyptian records, it is mentioned in the Execration Texts, the First Campaign of Thutmose III and the Amarna Letters (ca. 1800 BCE), and today what Acre means is a coastal city with a small harbor and loads of tourism and an absolute crazy history with too many conquers and defeats to count.
  • Jericho, the Ancient City, where Time Stood Still - Local authorities proudly call Jericho the ‘world’s oldest continuously inhabited city' and this is no idle boast – archaeological evidence traces the city’s history back over 10,000 years. When you visit Jericho, you will notice that it's not much changed since that time! Earthquakes proved Jericho's biggest challenge, leveling some of its most fantastic sites – such as Hisham's Palace – over the centuries. Jericho has modernized somewhat since the Canaanite period, but not much. Small-scale farming still makes up a significant portion of the local economy, although tourism is making inroads. The town is rather scruffy and unkempt but retains a raffish charm and a smiley demeanor. Most visitors just stay long enough to ascend the Mount of Temptation and marvel at the archaeological remains of Tel al-Sultan (Ancient Jericho).
  • Israel at a Glance - This article is about Israel in a glance. Many tourists asked me where they suppose to go! Well, here is your oversight depending on your intentions and preferences. Some people love historical sights, others religious, cultures, hiking, family, cities, beaches, deserts and much more. If that is so, Israel is your excellent destination.
  • Slaughter, Torture and Death in Jaffa - During the times of Ottoman in Israel, Napoleon led his armies to Jaffa in 1799 in order to capture this port city. He needed this city because it provided vital shelter for his fleet. Without Jaffa, his expedition in the Holy Land against the Ottoman would fail. But soon this expedition would turn into slaughter, rape, decapitations, torture, plague epidemics and death.
  • The Power of the Milk Grotto - A few yards along Milk Grotto Street, on the south side, is the Franciscan Chapel where tradition has it that the Holy Family sheltered on the way to Egypt. It is said that while Mary was breast-feeding the baby Jesus, some of the milk fell on the floor. This caused the rock to crumble.
  • Churches of Jerusalem Gallery - In Jerusalem are many churches and you see some of them in this gallery. Throughout the world, there are many churches, which are more imposing, more beautiful and much bigger, but in Jerusalem the churches have a much bigger history and many times are older.
  • Biblical Zoo - A family destination and Israel’s biggest tourist attraction, the Jerusalem Biblical Zoo covers over 62 acres of stunning terrain in the south of Jerusalem. The park centers on a vast man-made lake complete with waterfalls and side pools, surrounded by spacious lawns and shaded beauty spots with 2,200 animals and different 271 species.
  • The Seven Cursed Cities in Israel – Dead Cities until Now - Chorazin, Bethsaida, Capernaum, Sodom and Gomorrah are the cities, mentioned in the Torah, Old and New testament of the Christian bible, Quran and the hadith, which are cursed and destroyed. Sodom and Gomorrah saw their fate implemented immediately, while the cities Chorazin, Bethsaida and Capernaum died a slow death.
  • In the Footsteps of the Virgin Mary - Experience a spiritual journey of personal discovery and reaffirmation while tracing the life of Mary, the mother of Jesus, within the Biblical landscape in which she lived, rejoiced and sorrowed. This is not a tour, but a reference for All Who Seeks.
Go Up Go top
Churches
Church of the Redeemer
  • Church of St. Mary of Magdalene Gallery - An impressive gallery about the most amazing church in Jerusalem, the Church of St. Mary of Magdalene. Not only this church is so unbelievable beautiful, but the inside of the church is as well. And it's history is also very interesting.
  • Russian Orthodox Churches - Russia and Israel have a history and the Russian Orthodox church has a real history with Israel, as you can read here in this article about the Russian Orthodox Churches in Israel.
  • The History of the Christian Churches in Israel - An article about the history of the Christian churches in Israel. Because there are so many different groups of Christian churches, and Israel is seen as the central place for Christianity, they are all represented in this land. And because Israel is a democracy with the freedom of religion, and the churches choose to stay autonomous, who all share the holy places in the Holy Land, its history is long and complex.
  • St. Catherine’s Monastery – a Gem in the Egyptian Desert - The Orthodox establishment monastery holds the burning bush from which God first revealed himself to Moses. It also contains a treasure trove of icons, unique mosaic and ancient manuscripts. It's also one of the oldest Christian monasteries in the world and has been the center of monastic life in the southern Sinai.
  • Jericho, the Ancient City, where Time Stood Still - Local authorities proudly call Jericho the ‘world’s oldest continuously inhabited city' and this is no idle boast – archaeological evidence traces the city’s history back over 10,000 years. When you visit Jericho, you will notice that it's not much changed since that time! Earthquakes proved Jericho's biggest challenge, leveling some of its most fantastic sites – such as Hisham's Palace – over the centuries. Jericho has modernized somewhat since the Canaanite period, but not much. Small-scale farming still makes up a significant portion of the local economy, although tourism is making inroads. The town is rather scruffy and unkempt but retains a raffish charm and a smiley demeanor. Most visitors just stay long enough to ascend the Mount of Temptation and marvel at the archaeological remains of Tel al-Sultan (Ancient Jericho).
  • The ancient olive trees on the Mount of Olives - These are probably the most famous trees in the world. They are situated in the yard of the Church of All Nations, also known as the Basilica of the Agony, which is at the foot of the southern side of the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem. The trees are magnificent with their twisted, picturesque trunks, full of twists and even hollow and inclining trunks. Despite their antiquity, there is no precise scientific knowledge about their age. The theories range from 800 to around 2,000 years old. It is possible that the trees are here from Second Temple times, and are remnants of the olive groves in the Kidron Valley. Without a doubt the site being in the hands of the Moslems and later the Christians, as well as it being guarded, protected and cared for helped in the preservation of the trees.
  • Churches of Jerusalem Gallery - In Jerusalem are many churches and you see some of them in this gallery. Throughout the world, there are many churches, which are more imposing, more beautiful and much bigger, but in Jerusalem the churches have a much bigger history and many times are older.
  • Church of St Catherine of Alexandria - The midnight Mass beamed from Bethlehem to television viewers worldwide on Christmas Eve is celebrated in the Church of St Catherine of Alexandria. This 19th-century church adjoins the 6th-century Church of the Nativity, built over the cave where Jesus was born.
  • Kathisma – A forgotten and mysterious Gem - The Kathisma church was one of the Holy Land’s biggest churches and the first of them dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The Kathisma church was built around a rock where early Christian tradition says that the pregnant Mary rested while on her way with Joseph from Nazareth to Bethlehem. An early tradition says a miraculous spring appeared there to quench Mary’s thirst, and a 6th-century account tells of pilgrims drinking sweet water at the site.
  • St. Andrews Greek Catholic Church - This Greek Catholic (Melkite) Church, built in 1765, is located on the southern-western side of the old city of Acre. It is named after St. Andrews, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus.
  • St. George Greek-Orthodox Church - This Greek Orthodox Church, built in the 17th century, is located on the southern-western side of the old city of Acre. It is named after St. George of the city Lod. The church was built in the remains of a Crusader church. St George was born and lived in the 3rd C AD in the Holy Land city of Lod (Lydda), a city south of Ben-Gurion airport
  • Mount of Beatitudes Gallery - Here follows a gallery of images about the Mount of Beatitudes near the Sea of Galilee. You will see the images of the church from the outside and you will see the church from the inside. It's truly a beautiful building and church.
  • Nain – the Widow’s Son brought back to Life - In the village of Nain, Jesus brought back to life a widow’s son as he was being taken out through the town gate to be buried. Jesus met the funeral procession carrying the young man’s body and had compassion for the mother (Luke 7:11-17). He performed a miracle and the sun came back to live.
  • Ethiopian Patriarchy Deir Al Sultan - Ethiopian Patriarchy Deir Al Sultan St. The Ethiopian Church has about 25 million believers and they trace the origins of their faith to King Solomon and Queen Sheba. Despite being the oldest Christian church in Africa, the appointment of the Ethiopian was only in 1959, by Coptic Pope Kirill V and since the Ethiopians have been released from the auspices of the Coptic Church. There is a property dispute in Jerusalem between the communities. Head of the church in Jerusalem is an Archbishop, one of the ten Archbishops of the Ethiopian Church
  • Grotto of the Nativity – Oldest Church in the World - The Church of the Nativity is one of the world's oldest churches, built like a citadel over the cave where it is believed that Jesus was born. During the millennia the church became a holy place for many world religions, and so it is today a sacred place for various Christian religions and for Muslims.
  • 52 Churches in Jerusalem - A post about churches mainly in Jerusalem, Israel. Here we talk about the well known and the unknown churches and monasteries in Jerusalem and direct surrounding of this ancient city.
  • Orthodox Churches in Israel - A post about Russian-Orthodox churches in Israel, which is being used to create Orthodox tours. These collection of churches is interesting, because they are so unbelievable beautiful with a rich history.
  • Church of St Mary Magdalene - Seven gilded onion domes, each topped by a tall Russian Orthodox cross, make the Church of St Mary Magdalene one of Jerusalem’s most picturesque sights. It makes an especially striking spectacle at night, when its floodlit domes seem to be floating above the dark trees that surround it.
  • Jerusalem – Holy City for Billions all over the World - Jerusalem is seen as a Holy City by billions of people all over the world. For the Jews, this city is the city King David made capital of his kingdom and where the temple stood with the Ark of the Covenant. For Christians, it's where Christ died, buried and resurrected from the death. For the Muslims it's holy because they believe Muhammad ascended to heaven from the Temple Mount.
  • Church of All Nations - The Church of All Nations, standing near the foot of the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, is built over the rock on which Jesus is believed to have prayed in agony the night before he was crucified. The church and the adjacent Garden of Gethsemane, with its eight ancient olive trees, provide an evocative place for meditation, especially when visited at night. The church is also known as the Basilica of the Agony. Completed in 1924, it is the third church on the site.
  • Lutheran Church Services in Israel - An overview of the Lutheran religious services at the various churches in Israel
  • Orthodox Services in Jerusalem AND Bethlehem - An overview of the Orthodox religious services at the various churches in Jerusalem and Bethlehem
  • Catholic Masses outside Jerusalem - An overview of the Catholic masses at the various churches outside Jerusalem
  • Catholic Masses in Jerusalem - An overview of the Catholic masses at the various churches in Jerusalem
  • Church of the Nativity - The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is a major Christian holy site, as it marks the traditional place of Christ's birth. It is also one of the oldest surviving Christian churches.
Go Up Go top
Latrun Monastery
Monasteries
  • Most beautiful Monasteries in Israel Gallery - Here you find a collection of images about monasteries in Israel. Many of those monasteries are located remote, some in the desert, others hidden away in quiet corners somewhere ...
  • Paradise in the Negev: Ein Avdat National Park - Ein Avdat National Park is located in a beautiful canyon in the Negev desert. The Ein Avdat Spring flows down in a waterfall towards an 8-meter deep pool of water. The oasis created by the springs attracts ibex and other animals. The oasis at Ein Avdat is created by a number of springs which begin at the southern, or upper, section of the national park.
  • Sisters of Zion Convent or Les Soeurs De Sion Monastery - Thousands of pilgrims each year walk under the Ecce Homo Arch near the beginning of the Via Dolorosa without realising that extensive remains of first-century Jerusalem lie beneath their feet. For centuries Christians believed the arch was the place where Pontius Pilate displayed Jesus — beaten, crowned with thorns and clothed in a purple robe — to a hostile Jerusalem crowd with the words: “Behold the man” (“Ecce Homo” in Latin)
  • St. Catherine’s Monastery – a Gem in the Egyptian Desert - The Orthodox establishment monastery holds the burning bush from which God first revealed himself to Moses. It also contains a treasure trove of icons, unique mosaic and ancient manuscripts. It's also one of the oldest Christian monasteries in the world and has been the center of monastic life in the southern Sinai.
  • Latrun Monastery - Monastery of the Silent Monks at Latrun. The site where the monastery of the silent monks stands today served as a way station for pilgrims from Yafo to Jerusalem in the 19th century. After being sold to the Order of Saint Benedict, the monastery known as the monastery of the silent monks was built in 1890, and until 1960 its articles included a vow to refrain from idle talk and to uphold silence at all times except during prayer. A large church and living quarters sit on the monastery grounds, with a beautiful garden and a modest the yard.
  • Spyridon Monastery - Spyridon Monastery is a Greek Orthodox Center of Jabsha St., near the Northern Wall St. Spyridon was a Cypriot bishop in the 4th century AD, whose embalmed corpse traveled to Constantinople and in the 15th century was returned to the island of Corfu. According to residents of Corfu, Spyridon saved the island four times: once from the Turks, once from hunger and twice from disease. Many believers come to the Corfu church to see the complete body displayed to the public for a few minutes each day and once a year his hearse is paraded on the island.
  • Mar Saba Monastery - The Greek Orthodox Mar Saba Monastery in the Judean Desert east of Bethlehem seems to hang precariously from the walls of the Kidron Valley. But it is as sturdy as the faith it represents: it was built some 1,500 years ago, and is one of the oldest still-inhabited monasteries in the world.
  • St. Theodosius Monastery - St. Theodosius Monastery, founded in 476, is about 12 km east of Bethlehem. This monastery was destroyed during the Persian invasion. The building that stands today was constructed by the Greek Orthodox Church and incorporates the remains of an old Crusader building and is inhabited by a dozen Greek Monks.
  • Jericho, the Ancient City, where Time Stood Still - Local authorities proudly call Jericho the ‘world’s oldest continuously inhabited city' and this is no idle boast – archaeological evidence traces the city’s history back over 10,000 years. When you visit Jericho, you will notice that it's not much changed since that time! Earthquakes proved Jericho's biggest challenge, leveling some of its most fantastic sites – such as Hisham's Palace – over the centuries. Jericho has modernized somewhat since the Canaanite period, but not much. Small-scale farming still makes up a significant portion of the local economy, although tourism is making inroads. The town is rather scruffy and unkempt but retains a raffish charm and a smiley demeanor. Most visitors just stay long enough to ascend the Mount of Temptation and marvel at the archaeological remains of Tel al-Sultan (Ancient Jericho).
  • Churches of Jerusalem Gallery - In Jerusalem are many churches and you see some of them in this gallery. Throughout the world, there are many churches, which are more imposing, more beautiful and much bigger, but in Jerusalem the churches have a much bigger history and many times are older.
  • Deir Rafat Monastery - Deir Rafat also known as the Shrine of Our Lady Queen of Palestine and of the Holy Land, is a Catholic monastery in central Israel. Located to the north-west of Beit Shemesh, between Givat Shemesh and kibbutz Tzora to the south and Kfar Uria to the north, it falls under the jurisdiction of Mateh Yehuda Regional Council.
  • Horrific Battle by Elijah against Prophets of Baal - Horn of the Carmel, the monastery of the “place of burning” is the second largest site on the Carmel ridge and hovers at 497 meters above sea level. Here, an old monastery is situated belonging to the Carmelite Order, whose members arrived in the Holy Land from Europe in the 17th century. Map. According toContinue reading "Horrific Battle by Elijah against Prophets of Baal"
  • St. Catherine’s Monastery Gallery - St Catherine’s Monastery in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula is believed to enshrine the burning bush from which God first revealed himself to Moses. This is the gallery of this amazing monastery.
  • Monastery of St Gerasimus – the Man and his Lion - A place of hospitality and refreshment for pilgrims, with fruit trees, flowers and birdsong, the gold-domed monastery offers after a trip through the barren Judaean wilderness.
  • 52 Churches in Jerusalem - A post about churches mainly in Jerusalem, Israel. Here we talk about the well known and the unknown churches and monasteries in Jerusalem and direct surrounding of this ancient city.
  • Orthodox Churches in Israel - A post about Russian-Orthodox churches in Israel, which is being used to create Orthodox tours. These collection of churches is interesting, because they are so unbelievable beautiful with a rich history.
  • Jerusalem – Holy City for Billions all over the World - Jerusalem is seen as a Holy City by billions of people all over the world. For the Jews, this city is the city King David made capital of his kingdom and where the temple stood with the Ark of the Covenant. For Christians, it's where Christ died, buried and resurrected from the death. For the Muslims it's holy because they believe Muhammad ascended to heaven from the Temple Mount.
  • Orthodox Services in Jerusalem AND Bethlehem - An overview of the Orthodox religious services at the various churches in Jerusalem and Bethlehem
  • Catholic Masses outside Jerusalem - An overview of the Catholic masses at the various churches outside Jerusalem
  • Wadi Qelt & Nabi Musa - The steep canyon of Wadi Qelt links Jerusalem to Jericho and has a number of interesting religious sites along its course, as well as springs, plants and wildlife, and often breathtaking views over the mountains and desert. The whole canyon is hikeable, although it would take a full day, and even in the spring and autumn the heat can be intense.
  • Dom Polski - Polish Catholic Monastery Albatiah Aqbat St. The name means: Polish Home. The monastery is subordinate to the Head of the Polish church in Warsaw, and a hostel for pilgrims is operated on site. The monastery is a large structure on Third Wall Street and an orphanage on the slopes of the Mount of Olives. The nuns commemorate Elizabeth, a Christian saint from the beginning of the 13th century who, after she was widowed at age 20, donated her capital to the poor and hospitals, and after her death became a symbol of Christian charity.
  • Kursi National Park - Kursi, east of the Sea of Galilee at the mouth of a riverbed descending from the Golan Heights, is traditionally the place where Jesus exorcised demons from two possessed men (Matthew 8:28-33).
  • Mount Tabor - Mount Tabor, rising dome-like from the Plain of Jezreel, is the mountain where Christian tradition places the Transfiguration of Jesus. Scholars disagree on whether Mount Tabor was the scene of that event (described in Matthew 17:1-9; Mark 9: 2-8 and Luke 9:28-36).
  • Ein Prat Nature Reserve - Ein Prat Nature Reserve The spring of En Prat emerges into a natural rock pool and creates a welcoming oasis in the upper Prat Stream. Antiquity sites dot the stream banks, including monasteries and a second-century BCE aqueduct. Mediterranean, arid-land and water-loving vegetation fill the reserve, and among the animals is a herd of gazelles.
  • Mount Temptation - After being baptized by John the Baptist Jesus retreated to the wilderness to meditate and fast, the mountain on which Jesus is believed to have spent the 40 days and 40 nights of spiritual contemplation is called the Mount of Temptation. The Mount of Temptation is also known as Mount Quarantania and Jabel Quruntul from the Latin word for forty in reference to the forty days Jesus fasted on the mountain.
Go Up Go top
Christianity – Church Services in Israel
Russian Orthodox Ascension Church Jerusalem
Go Up Go top


Entertainment

InDNegev Music Festival 2016
  • 18 Zoos in Israel. Here you can find a collection of 18 zoos in Israel. Behind each zoo you see a telephone number you must use before you are going to visit the zoo.
  • 24 Clean beaches in Israel. If you’re out there wondering if any of Israel’s gorgeous beaches are environmentally friendly, wonder no more! 21 beaches – and 3 marinas – in Israel have recently been awarded the Blue Flag by the FEE (Foundation for Environmental Education) for environmental excellence! So, yes, you can swim, surf, and frolic knowing you’re in safe, environmentally clean hands!
  • 27 Amusement parks
  • 38 theme and amusement parks. Someone said that there are not many amusement parks in Israel. Ah!  She was so wrong. Here we have 38 amusement and theme parks.
  • Beaches of Eilat. Beaches and water sport are the dominating swimming activities in Eilat and in this article you will see what you can do here and what beaches we are talking about. In Eilat, there are two types of beach/water-tourists; those who love to swim in the Red Sea and those who prefer the water pools of their hotel.
  • Best bars and clubs in Tel Aviv. Tel Aviv’s nightlife scene is definitely one of the best in the world, there is a bar or club for every taste, from chilled outdoor bars to get a beer and some good food, to underground techno clubs with crazy hardcore parties.
  • Clubbing in Tel Aviv. The Tel Aviv club scene is comparable to those in most European capitals. Top international (and local) DJs regularly perform in Tel Aviv, with clubs constantly vying to outdo each other with ever more extravagant parties. Be aware, Clubbing in Tel Aviv is popular, busy and exciting. Click here for maps of Tel Aviv
  • Dance in Israel. The internationally-known Bat Sheva company is the mainstay of modern Israeli dance. There are no classical ballet companies in Israel, but contemporary dance is very much alive here. The focal point of dance activity is the Suzanne Dellal Center, a superb, old Ottoman building at the heart of the historic, southern Tel Aviv district of Neve Tzedek, which has benefited from extensive architectural renewal.
  • Drinking and Nightlife in the Holy City. Jerusalem’s city center has loads of bars. The best are in the Mahane Yehuda Market area and in the vicinity of Zion Sq, on Rivlin, Ben Shatah, Helene HaMalka and Dorot Rishonim streets. East Jerusalem bars tend to be inside hotels, while the Old City is almost as dry as the Negev. You need some kind of manual in order to know what you can and can’t do in the old city of Jerusalem, but when you know, nobody can’t stop you having fun in a safe way.
  • Entertainment in Israel.
  • Entertainment for children. In northern Tel Aviv, the Ramat Gan Safari Zoo makes a good outing for children. You can drive through and observe the wildlife in its natural habitat. The Children’s Museum in Holon, a short drive from Tel Aviv, has lots of fun, interactive exhibits.
    Mini Israel, which is just off the main highway that runs between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, has over 350 miniature models of the Holy Land’s most important landmarks. On the shores of the Dead Sea, just south of Jericho.
  • Planetariums in Israel. Please call them before you visit. And it’s also a good idea to get advised when you can visit. Star gazing in the night is a total different experience then at day! Also, star gazing in Mitzpe Ramon without that disturbing light of a city is a much better experience then anywhere else.
  • Sailing in Israel. A land of snow (Hermon), the land of the sub-tropics (Eilat), the land of the deserts and mountains, the land of the ancient cities, the land of the ancient cultures, dynamic modern cities, the many hotels, hostels, guest houses, zimmers, and not to forget the incredible natures reserves with truly unbelievable landscapes … the only thing it misses is sailing. But does it?
  • Sailing on the Sea of Galilee. As you head out to sail on the Sea of Galilee from the pier Tiberias, Genesaret, Capernaum National Park or Ein Gev, the spray refreshes you, gulls wheel overhead, and other “sailors” call out greetings.
  • Theater in Israel. Plays in Israel are almost always performed in Hebrew (or, less commonly, Arabic), although some of the bigger theaters such as Tel Aviv’s Ha-Bima Theater and New Cameri Theater (and Jerusalem’s Sherover Theater) have headphones providing English-language translation for some performances, though there are a lot of performances in English as well. Productions, in all cases, range from revivals of the classics of world drama (both old and modern) to first-run stagings of new Israeli plays.

See all entertainment.

Go top
Music in Israel
Traditional music by shlomitmessica
Traditional music by shlomitmessica
Go top

See All Music in Israel.

Hiking in Israel

Hiking
  • Hiking at Ein Gedi in Israel - Ein Gedi is without any doubt one of the most beautiful places in Israel. That place simply looks amazing, especially there in the middle of the desert! It's an oasis, a place coming straight from a story book. But Ein Gedi is not only a place to visit with the family, it's also a place for hikes!
  • Useful information - On this page you find very useful information about Israel from the perspective of the tourist coming from outside Israel and for those who are living in Israel and like to 'play' the tourist. This page is actually golden information for the 'stranger', because it summarises this site on one page.
  • Metula, is it British or French? Or maybe it’s a Swiss Alpine? - Situated at the Galilee’s northernmost tip, this picturesque, hilltop village – surrounded on three sides by Lebanon – was founded in 1896 with help from the French branch of the Rothschild family. In 1920 its location played a crucial role in the decision to include the Galilee Panhandle in the British Mandate of Palestine rather than the French Mandate of Lebanon. Today, the economy is based on tourists in the mood for a Swiss alpine vibe and on fruit orchards growing apples, pears, peaches, nectarines, apricots, kiwifruit and lychees.
  • Arad, the Town where there is nothing to do, except … - A popular base for those visiting nearby Masada, Arad sits on a high plateau between Be’er Sheva and the Dead Sea. There are no sights worthy of mention in the town. With other words, when you're looking for a place to eat or sleep when you're visiting the Dead Sea, this is the town for you.
  • Hiking in Israel - With its unbelievably diverse terrain – ranging from the alpine slopes of Mt Hermon to the parched wadis (river bed) of the Negev – and almost 10,000km of marked trails, Israel offers some truly superb hiking. The country gets little or no precipitation for at least half the year so Israelis can plan outings without having to worry about getting rained on – and, because water is so precious, they love nothing more than to spend a summer’s day sloshing through a spring-fed stream shaded by lush vegetation. Whenever you hit the trails, don’t forget to bring a hat and plenty of water, and plan your day so you can make it back before dark.
  • Solomon’s Pillars - An impressive set of high red sandstone hills, one of the most famous sites in the south of Israel, located in the center of the Timna Valley - today a nature & history park. The area is one of the most ancient copper mines, dating to the end of the 5th Millennium BCE (about 6,000 years ago).
  • Red Canyon - If you’re feeling a little adventurous and fancy some hiking in amazing desert scenery, head out of Eilat to the Red Canyon (head out west on Road 12). You’ll probably want to book a tour just to be on the safe side, and the tour will likely include a number of other sites, depending on what you want, but of course, you can always go solo (but please take lots of water with you!).
  • Qumran Caves – Confirming the Bible and Torah? - The caves of Qumran are famous since the discovery of the The Qumran Scrolls, the oldest manuscript of the Hebrew Bible in 1920. Tens of thousands of scroll fragments written in three different languages: Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. They were stored in cylindrical pottery jars with a lid of a type unknown elsewhere.
  • The Dramatic Story of the Battle of Masada - For two years 1,000 Jewish men, women and children were able to hold off the Roman army of 15,000 soldiers in Masada. The Romans were forced to built a huge sloping siege ramp to move battering rams up to the walls to subdue the defenders. At the end, they were able to breach the walls of the defenders by sheer weight of numbers. This is the story of the defenders and attackers of Masada.
  • Bird Watching Site (in the desert near Eilat) - Pools (Salt Pools near Eilat) attract wide variety of bird life, including ducks, plovers, yellow wagtails, red-throated pipits and white-winged terns. The flock of flamingos is most remarkable. Acacia trees to the west provide shelter to a variety of songbirds
  • Amirim near Mountain Meron – The Battle between Fruit and Wine - West of Tsfat, antenna-topped Mt Meron (1204m), Israel’s second-tallest peak (after Mt Hermon), looms over the Dalton Plateau and scattered Jewish, Druze and Arab villages. Until recently, the area was planted with deciduous fruit trees such as pear and apple, but more and more land is being given over to grapevines for the thriving wineries of Ramat Dalton, sometimes called (with some exaggeration) the ‘Israeli Napa Valley’ or ‘Israel’s Tuscany’. Oh, one word of warning! This is the 'land of the not-meat eating communities'.
  • The best 10 hiking trails in Israel - Israel is a hiker’s paradise. The country is crisscrossed with trails, including the 580-mile long Israel Trail, which starts in the northern Galilee and winds its way south until it reaches the tip of Eilat. All of Israel’s trails are clearly marked by colors painted on rocks, and you can buy a set of 20 glossy maps (about $25 each) to keep you moving in the right direction.
  • Sodom Day Tour - By tradition, this area is the site of Sodom and Gomorrah, the biblical cities that were destroyed in a storm of fire and brimstone, punishment from God because of their people’s depravity (Genesis 18-19). These days, Sodom is much better known for its desert hiking and cycling trails than for sodomy. And for that we have this day tour. Normally, a day tour occupies about a half day, but I added several hiking opportunities to this day you and that means you will be busy the whole day. It's breathtaking nature in action.
  • Abraham Path hiking - The Abraham Path in the Negev currently crosses the northern section of the desert from west to east starting at the city of Beer Sheva, today the ‘capital of the Negev’ and largest city in the south of the country, but known as the place of Abraham’s Well which, according to the Book of Genesis, was dug by Abraham when he entered the city.
  • The Arava, Hiking, Biking and Swimming in the Desert - This austerely beautiful and sparsely populated desert stretches from the Dead Sea to the Red Sea and has as its backdrop the majestic multi-hued Jordanian mountain range known in Israel as the Edom (Red) Mountains and its becoming known as a center for outdoor activities, especially cycling. A popular 33km bike trail runs along a wadi (dry river bed) between Zofar and Paran, and the desert terrain is a favorite destination for 4WD enthusiasts. In rainy years, Eshet Lake near Paran is a popular swimming spot.
  • Archaeological 12 Day Tour - Tens of thousands of years of history comes alive: see for yourself the ancient civilizations and experience Israel through its rich archaeology. This tour is not clean! You get dirty!! You will visit the archaeological sights from the north to the south of the country. You will help digging in the dust and the mud, go trough water, rivers, pools, desert, stones, ruins … it’s amazing for those who are interested in the archaeology of Israel, see for yourself how people lived thousands, even tens of thousands of years ago.
  • Katzrin, Capital of the Golan - Katzrin (Qazrin), ‘capital of the Golan’, with 6,725 people living there, makes an excellent base for exploring the central Golan and stocking up on picnic supplies. Founded in 1977, it is the region’s only real town. The lively little commercial center, Merkaz Eitan, is a classic 1970s complex that was spruced up considerably in 2013 – adding a tile-covered sculpture that is as whimsical as it is colorful. In addition to a bank and some eateries, it has a first-rate museum. Everything closes on Shabbat.
  • Wadi Daraja - One of the more difficult hikes in the area, this steep canyon descent (five to six hours not including stops), known in Hebrew as Nahal Darga, requires you to climb down about two dozen waterfalls (30m climbing rope required) and swim across year-round pools up to 4m deep – all your kit will get wet so leave those mobile phones and cameras somewhere safe.
  • Wadi Qelt & Nabi Musa - The steep canyon of Wadi Qelt links Jerusalem to Jericho and has a number of interesting religious sites along its course, as well as springs, plants and wildlife, and often breathtaking views over the mountains and desert. The whole canyon is hikeable, although it would take a full day, and even in the spring and autumn the heat can be intense.
  • Ein Bokek Day Tour - This day tour is about Ein Bokek, which is sandwiched between the turquoise waters of the southern Dead Sea and a dramatic tan bluff, the strip of luxury hotels is the region’s main tourist zone and a 'secret' canyon. Ein Bokek has the area's nicest free beaches, and is the Dead Sea’s main center for treating ailments such as psoriasis, arthritis and respiratory conditions with naturally occurring minerals and compounds.
  • Masada Tour - This is a day tour for you, which is dedicated to Masada. But in Israel everything is different when you get there, I added information about accommodations (guest house and camping sites). Also it's a great idea to add some information about restaurants and of course how you get there and back to where you came from.
  • Family and Children Tour 10 Days - This tour is for families and their children. It will bring you to Tel Aviv, Caesarea, Acre, Sea of Galilee, Golan, Safed, Jerusalem and Eilat. The tour is designed for the individual, as for groups, with or without a professional guide. The guide can speak English, German and Dutch.
  • Makhtesh - A makhtesh is a geological landform considered unique to the Negev desert of Israel and the Sinai peninsula of Egypt. A makhtesh has steep walls of resistant rock surrounding a deep closed valley which is usually drained by a single wadi. This is popular with the hikers!
  • Meshushim Pool in the Yehudiya Nature Reserve - One of the most fantastic hikes is the Hexagon Pool (Meshushm) in the Yehudiya Nature Reserve. Situated north of the Sea of Galilee and of the small community called Had Ness on road 888, the pool is located at the bottom of a deep canyon, walled in with hexagonal basalt rock formations, flowing water and cascades.
  • Magen David Square - Six streets and areas that intersect here are King George, Shenkin, Allenby, Nachalat Binyamin, HaCarmel and the Carmel Market. King George is a busy commercial centre, Shenkin is the one-and-only stop needed for fashion-crazy shopaholics, Allenby is both historical as well as being a hub of nightlife, Nachalat Binyamin's claim to fame is it's twice-weekly outdoor arts and crafts fair and HaCarmel Street is home to Tel Aviv's biggest marketplace, Carmel Market and makes for an exciting and fascinating visit.

See All Hiking.

Go top

Food in Israel

Tel Aviv Food I love Israeli food
  • Useful information - On this page you find very useful information about Israel from the perspective of the tourist coming from outside Israel and for those who are living in Israel and like to 'play' the tourist. This page is actually golden information for the 'stranger', because it summarises this site on one page.
  • Eating in Tel Aviv - Tel Aviv’s eating scene is both varied and exciting. Coinciding with the boutique makeover that the city is undergoing, there is a rising crop of ‘chef restaurants’ (i.e. those run by celebrity chefs), as well as an ever-growing number of swanky brasseries. But don’t worry if you're on a budget – there are still plenty of cheap street-food eateries and kiosks to choose from.
  • Drinking & Nightlife in the Holy City Jerusalem - Jerusalem’s city center has loads of bars. The best are in the Mahane Yehuda Market area and in the vicinity of Zion Sq, on Rivlin, Ben Shatah, Helene HaMalka and Dorot Rishonim streets. East Jerusalem bars tend to be inside hotels, while the Old City is almost as dry as the Negev. You need some kind of manual in order to know what you can and can't do in the old city of Jerusalem, but when you know, nobody can't stop you having fun in a safe way.
  • Jericho, the Ancient City, where Time Stood Still - Local authorities proudly call Jericho the ‘world’s oldest continuously inhabited city' and this is no idle boast – archaeological evidence traces the city’s history back over 10,000 years. When you visit Jericho, you will notice that it's not much changed since that time! Earthquakes proved Jericho's biggest challenge, leveling some of its most fantastic sites – such as Hisham's Palace – over the centuries. Jericho has modernized somewhat since the Canaanite period, but not much. Small-scale farming still makes up a significant portion of the local economy, although tourism is making inroads. The town is rather scruffy and unkempt but retains a raffish charm and a smiley demeanor. Most visitors just stay long enough to ascend the Mount of Temptation and marvel at the archaeological remains of Tel al-Sultan (Ancient Jericho).
  • The Tour from Hell - This tour was the tour from hell ... for me. For the group absolutely not, because they had loads of fun, costing me my hair of course. We are talking about a tour, which shows what Israel actually is, a mixture of culture, adventure, exploration and Israeli sights in all the major touristic centers of Israel. This article is part of the Tour Guide Diaries September 2016.
  • Arad, the Town where there is nothing to do, except … - A popular base for those visiting nearby Masada, Arad sits on a high plateau between Be’er Sheva and the Dead Sea. There are no sights worthy of mention in the town. With other words, when you're looking for a place to eat or sleep when you're visiting the Dead Sea, this is the town for you.
  • Best Vegan Restaurants in Tel Aviv - Tel Aviv is one of the most vegan friendly cities in the world! Almost in every restaurant in the heart of the city you will be able to find innovative, delicious and nutritious vegan options, from the basic salads and sandwiches to more elaborate dishes, the days when vegan food meant a bowl of greens are over! So whether you are a vegan, a vegetarian, or just love trying new things, you have to check out the restaurants in our guide to the Best Vegan Restaurants in Tel Aviv, based on the answers of over 400 food lovers of the Secret Tel Aviv Community.
  • Restaurants in Tel Aviv - Tel Aviv has loads of restaurants in all kinds, representing all areas of the Arab world, as is the rest of the world. And you know what, you can always find something for any budget. You can choose a boutique type restaurant, or you can choose a restaurant, where you have a full meal for a few shekels. And then there are those restaurants, which are based on the rising crop of 'chef restaurants' and an ever-growing number of swanky brasseries.
  • Jish, Catholic Town in the Golan, where they speak Aramaic - The only village in Israel with a Maronite (Eastern Catholic) majority, serene hillside Jish (population 3000) was settled by migrants from Lebanon in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today it is the site of a pioneering effort to revive the use of Aramaic, the language of Jesus and an important source of identity for Maronites. Most shops are closed on Sunday.
  • Three Days in Haifa - Haifa is one of the Middle East's most picturesque cities, and it's target for this small mini-tour for this amazing place. This page contains enough information for you to have this tour and spend it full with interesting sights, events, smells, tastes and experiences for the whole family. Like with Tfzat, here is the guide insight information for you.
  • Taco Tuesdays at Burning Tacos - One of our favorite Mexican restaurants are back with their weekly Taco Tuesday! Hip hop all night long, chaser tequila with every order!
  • Restaurants in Modern Jerusalem - Throughout the years of touring, I've a list of restaurants in modern Jerusalem, which I've visited with the various groups. What restaurant I visit depends totally on the type of group (young, old, religious, nationalistic, standard tourists, gem-tours, etc). Here is the list of those restaurants followed with a short description.
Go top

Maps about Israel

Map of Tel Aviv
  • Useful information - On this page you find very useful information about Israel from the perspective of the tourist coming from outside Israel and for those who are living in Israel and like to 'play' the tourist. This page is actually golden information for the 'stranger', because it summarises this site on one page.
  • Are you coming to Israel? Read this first! - When you plan to come to Israel, here are some golden tips, which might very likely save you some $$$$. And it also might save you time, misery and have a vacation, you'll never forget, the best ever. And it's also the way to use the resources of this site.
  • Maps of the Negev - Here you find a collection of maps about Negev for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Tzfat - Here you find a collection of maps about Tzfat for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Sea of Galilee - Here you find a collection of maps about Sea of Galilee for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Bethlehem - Here you find a collection of maps about Bethlehem for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Tiberias - Here you find a collection of maps about Tiberias for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Tel Aviv - Here you find a collection of maps about Tel Aviv for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Nazareth - Here you find a collection of maps about Nazareth for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Nablus - Here you find a collection of maps about Nablus for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Jerusalem Old City - Here you find a collection of maps about Jerusalem Old City for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Jerusalem - Here you find a collection of maps about Jerusalem for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Jericho - Here you find a collection of maps about Jericho for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Hebron - Here you find a collection of maps about Hebron for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Haifa - Here you find a collection of maps about Haifa for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Golan - Here you find a collection of maps about Golan for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Eilat - Here you find a collection of maps about Eilat for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Masada - Here you find a collection of maps about Masada for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of the Dead Sea - Here you find a collection of maps about Dead Sea for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Beer Sheva - Here you find a collection of maps about Beer Sheva for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Acre (Akko) - Here you find a collection of maps about Acre or Akko for you to download and/or to print. These maps are coming from the public domain.
  • Maps of Israel - Here you can find the extended collection of maps about Israel. The sources of the maps are from the public domain and are free to download or print.

See all maps.

Go top

Markets in Israel

Carmel Market
  • September 2019 – Khao San – Thai Street Food Festival - The favorite colors, smells and flavors of Thailand’s famous Khao San Street come to the heart of Tel Aviv in the first Thai food and culture festival of its kind! Thai street food stalls of Israel’s best restaurants, cocktails, cultural shows, street art, exhibitions and many more surprises and experiences.
  • Useful information - On this page you find very useful information about Israel from the perspective of the tourist coming from outside Israel and for those who are living in Israel and like to 'play' the tourist. This page is actually golden information for the 'stranger', because it summarises this site on one page.
  • September 2019 – Garage Sale – A huge antique market in Givon Square - A special event with a selection of vintage items, collectibles, antiques and second hand. Dozens of stalls are filled with high quality items and special prices. What will be on sale? Furniture, toys and games, chandeliers, ceramics and porcelain, paintings, posters and signs, rare collectible records, turntables, coins, banknotes and stamps, kitchenware, copper and enamel.
  • The Tour from Hell - This tour was the tour from hell ... for me. For the group absolutely not, because they had loads of fun, costing me my hair of course. We are talking about a tour, which shows what Israel actually is, a mixture of culture, adventure, exploration and Israeli sights in all the major touristic centers of Israel. This article is part of the Tour Guide Diaries September 2016.
  • Market in Be’er Sheba - The Bedouin trade market starts at daybreak each Thursday and lasts until early afternoon, but it's best to get there early. Walk to the back, passing coffee and tea sellers. For sale, if you can find them, are embroidered dresses, woven camel bags, bales of wool, coin headbands (used as dowry gifts), and finjans (Bedouin coffee pots).
  • Bedouin Chicken Market - This is the gallery about the Bedouin Chicken Market in Be-er Sheva. They call it the Bedouin trade market, like the Bedouin Goat Market. and the 'normal' Bedouin market. And it's not only chickens they 'trade'! When you as tourist visit the market and you're female, please dress appropriate to avoid problems (cover your head, elbows and knees).
  • Bedouin Goat Market Gallery - This is the gallery about the Bedouin Goat Market in Be-er Sheva. They call it the Bedouin trade market, just off of the old town and in the center of the very under-developed industrial part of Be-er Sheva. It's one of the markets, where tourists don't come because they don't know it and ... they might disturb the careful trading happening there ...
  • September 2019 – Mandala Market – Holidays Edition - We invite you, fashion lovers, inspirational hunters, Pickups, mothers and children, passengers aAnd those who just wanted to go out to drink and escape from the hot sun. Come together right now..over here..
  • September 2019 – Old Jaffa’s Artists’ Fair - Old Jaffa invites you to spend a week in style – an artist and designer fair, street artists, a breeze from the sea and breathtaking views of Tel Aviv beaches. Among the fair stalls run by the artists themselves – painting, product design, ecological products, accessories, jewelry designers, ceramic artists, home decor, bags, special candles and even succulents.
  • September 2019 – Artist’s and Flea Market @ Cuckoo’s Nest - Fair “Artists and Fsfsim” returns to the nest Cuckoo second round of the stalls pop-up of some of the designer and the artists favorite city! For the holiday of Tishrei busy, levels of nest will be filled with the broader market and loaded with everything you wanted for Christmas: handmade silver jewelry, First vintage and second-hand, domestic brands passionate, Frintim, T-shirts, home decor items and many more surprises!
  • Are you coming to Israel? Read this first! - When you plan to come to Israel, here are some golden tips, which might very likely save you some $$$$. And it also might save you time, misery and have a vacation, you'll never forget, the best ever. And it's also the way to use the resources of this site.
  • Ramla, the City with the Colorful Markets - It’s not quite as old as nearby Jaffa – history here stretches back ‘only’ 1300 years – but Ramla's bustling market, underground pools and crumbling Islamic architecture make it an interesting half-day trip from Tel Aviv. Try to visit on a Wednesday, when the market is at its busiest and most colorful. Established in 716 CE by the Umayyid caliph Suleiman, Ramla (spot of sand) was a stopover on the road from Egypt to Damascus. Prior to the arrival of the Crusaders in the 11th century, it was Palestine’s capital and it maintained its importance in the Middle Ages as the first stop for the Jerusalem-bound pilgrims who came ashore at Jaffa. Following the 1948 Arab–Israeli War the majority of the Arab population were expelled or fled and was replaced by poor Jewish immigrants, mainly from Asia (eg India) and North Africa. It's now a friendly mix of Arabs (20%) and Jews (80%).
  • Carmel Market - The Carmel Market in Tel Aviv is one of the must-sees in Tel Aviv. If you want a taste of the real Israel, this is the place to go. It’s also an amazing place to visit, and the sights, sounds and smells make it a place you won’t forget in a hurry.
  • Levinsky Market - The Levinsky Market is the place for spices. And dried fruits, nuts, traditional pastries, boutique cheeses, pickled produce, exotic meat cold cuts and salted fish. The climax of activity is on Friday mornings, as residents pack narrow Levinsky Street to visit their favorite delicatessens, bakery shops, roasted nut stalls and spice shops. If you do head to this market, start or end your tour in the neighborhood of Florentin – Tel Aviv’s SoHo of the über cool and working class.
  • Magen David Square - Six streets and areas that intersect here are King George, Shenkin, Allenby, Nachalat Binyamin, HaCarmel and the Carmel Market. King George is a busy commercial centre, Shenkin is the one-and-only stop needed for fashion-crazy shopaholics, Allenby is both historical as well as being a hub of nightlife, Nachalat Binyamin's claim to fame is it's twice-weekly outdoor arts and crafts fair and HaCarmel Street is home to Tel Aviv's biggest marketplace, Carmel Market and makes for an exciting and fascinating visit.
  • Dizengoff Center - Dizengoff Center is a shopping mall at the intersection of Dizengoff Street and King George Street in Tel Aviv. The mall is named for Meir Dizengoff, the first mayor of Tel Aviv. Dizengoff Center, designed by Israeli architect Yitzhak Yashar, was Israel's first mall. The center was built on the site of the Nordiya neighborhood.
  • Tel Aviv North Port - Namal Tel Aviv, the Tel Aviv Port has recently been restored and is now one of the hottest places in town. During the day, the cafes and stores at Namal Tel Aviv (the Tel Aviv Port) the host some of the city’s richest and trendiest, whilst at night, Namal Tel Aviv transforms into one of Tel Aviv’s most popular nightlife venues. Oh, and by the way, you wont see any big ships here, maybe just a few yachts.
  • Hutzot Hayotzer Artists Colony - Two years after the reunification of Jerusalem in 1967, a no-man’s land between the New and Old City of Jerusalem was transformed into an artist’s colony. It contains studios and galleries of 24 carefully selected Israeli artists creating in both traditional and contemporary styles in the diverse art fields of Painting, Sculpture, Calligraphy, Tapestry, Leather, Ceramics, Judaica and Jewelry.
  • Mahane Yehuda Market - In the heart of a neighborhood in downtown Jerusalem, the largest open market in Israel was built in 1928, between Mahane Yehuda and Etz Haim Streets. Here you can find everything from housewares to clothes, but mainly fresh food of every sort: fruits and vegetables, fish and poultry, bread and baked goods, inexpensive restaurants to suit every palate.
  • Nazareth market - The Nazareth Market is the perfect place to step back into the past and experience the childhood hometown of Jesus as it may have been 2000 years ago. The Nazareth Market, bazaar or shuq is not as big as other Israeli markets but is has a certain charm.
  • Yaffa Flea Market - Yaffa is the ancient port out of which modern day Tel Aviv has grown. The Yafo Flea Market, or, in Hebrew Shuk Hapishpishim is one of the highlights of the area with vendors selling products of any variety imaginable lining the sidewalks. Weaving your way through an array of treasure, junk, and daily basics, you’ll see everything from Judaica, Persian tiles, jewelery, old jeans, and Indian mildewed clothes. Its an incredible cultural experience, where bargaining and haggling rule the day… fun in itself.
  • Old Yaffa Port - The Yafo Port Market, in the Port of Yafo is a unique destination. A converted hangar in the harbor, below the Old City, the Port Market was created in 2012 and features a number of select, high quality food stalls, from gourmet bakeries to an oyster bar, and authentic Middle Eastern foods such as hummus, to high quality sausages. The Port Market also hosts an array of design oriented shops.
  • Daliat El Carmel - Daliyat el-Carmel is a Druze village high on the slopes of Mt. Carmel and has an exceptionally unique character. It is a colorful village that offers wonderful hospitality with a smile and is also very interesting. The Druze is an ethnic group that split off from Islam in Egypt about 1,000 years ago.
  • Haifa Flea Market - Recommended to arrive early as parking may be a problem later in the morning ----and good items may already have been found and bought!! I have bought numerous unusual finds here, and also new items which were probably end-of-the-range in defunked shops. One can find whole libraries of books, dinner services,wine glasses,pots and pans, many new and unused alongside specialized metal items, some furniture, old electrical goods and vintage clothes and household goods. There are two tiny cafes in the market and some Arab food stalls.

See all markets.

Go top

Museums in Israel

Negev Museum of Art
  • September 2019 – Tour of the Tel Aviv Museum for children - Women and girls are represented against men and boys in the painting of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. What has changed in the last two hundred years in art and choice. An optimistic tour of how the world has become a better and more equitable place in the arts. A tour of the arts, culture, society, geography and politics for girls and boys and girls and boys as well as adults and adults.
  • Ramla, the City with the Colorful Markets - It’s not quite as old as nearby Jaffa – history here stretches back ‘only’ 1300 years – but Ramla's bustling market, underground pools and crumbling Islamic architecture make it an interesting half-day trip from Tel Aviv. Try to visit on a Wednesday, when the market is at its busiest and most colorful. Established in 716 CE by the Umayyid caliph Suleiman, Ramla (spot of sand) was a stopover on the road from Egypt to Damascus. Prior to the arrival of the Crusaders in the 11th century, it was Palestine’s capital and it maintained its importance in the Middle Ages as the first stop for the Jerusalem-bound pilgrims who came ashore at Jaffa. Following the 1948 Arab–Israeli War the majority of the Arab population were expelled or fled and was replaced by poor Jewish immigrants, mainly from Asia (eg India) and North Africa. It's now a friendly mix of Arabs (20%) and Jews (80%).
  • Katzrin, Capital of the Golan - Katzrin (Qazrin), ‘capital of the Golan’, with 6,725 people living there, makes an excellent base for exploring the central Golan and stocking up on picnic supplies. Founded in 1977, it is the region’s only real town. The lively little commercial center, Merkaz Eitan, is a classic 1970s complex that was spruced up considerably in 2013 – adding a tile-covered sculpture that is as whimsical as it is colorful. In addition to a bank and some eateries, it has a first-rate museum. Everything closes on Shabbat.
  • Jesus Boat - Two amateur archaeologists fishermen brothers, Moshe and Yuval Lufan, stumbled across the outline of something, which might look like a buried boat in 1986. It was on the north-west shore of the Sea of Galilee, near Migdal, the home of Mary Magdalene.
  • Archaeology Museums in Israel - Israel is a country with a rich history. That's an understatement. It's a country built and grown of an unbelievable unique and exotic history, which made Israel as it is today and influences civilizations today
  • Tel Be’er Sheba - Tel Be'er Sheva is a National park, featuring the ruins of an Israelite Kingdom fortified administrative city. The ancient city is located between the Be'er Sheva and Hebron streams. The Bible associated the acts of Abraham and Isaac to the name of the city, which reads in Hebrew as the "Well of the oath", or "seven wells".
  • Israeli Air Force Museum - To the north of the city, at Hatzerim Air Base, there is one of the most famous aircraft museums in the world: The Israeli Air Force museum. Here, preserved by the dry desert air, are aircraft from Israel's entire history.
  • Negev Museum of Art - The Negev Museum of Art is located in the Old City of Beer Sheva, in a charming historic building that was used in the past as home to the Turkish governor, during the Ottoman reign in Israel. The structure was built in 1906 next to the grand mosque and other governmental buildings. During the British mandate the building was used as home to the appointed district officer, and later as a girls' school.
  • Yigal Alon Museum at Kibbutz Ginosar - Located on the grounds of Kibbutz Ginnosar on the Sea of Galilee, the museum is named after Yigal Alon (1918-1980), member of Kibbutz Ginnosar, military and political leader, and believer in coexistence and peace. The museum hosts changing exhibits of art by Jews and Arabs. Its permanent exhibits showcase the history of the Galilee from ancient times to the present, the history of the pre-state force, the Palmach, and Alon’s own story, and the famous 2,000 year-old Galilee Boat.
  • Culture Square - Tel Aviv is Israel’s culture city. Most of the museums, orchestras, theaters, art galleries, dance venues and music halls come with an entry fee, however. To get a taste of the city’s arts scene, head over to Culture Square at the end of Rothschild Boulevard.
  • Eretz Yisrael Museum - Eretz Yisrael (Land of Israel) Museum - This is a stunning museum spread across a beautiful campus in the Ramat Aviv district of the city, overlooking the center of Tel Aviv. The Eretz Israel Museum has an amazing array of displays relating to archaeology, judaica, ethnography, history and culture and arts and crafts, each housed in a pavilion, of which there are many spread across the museum site, centered around an archaeological site.
  • Israel’s Independence Hall - Independence Hall. The home of Zina and Meir Dizengoff – First Mayor of Tel Aviv, one of the first houses in Tel Aviv, was chosen to host the declaration of the state in 1948, and is now named Independence Hall and serves as an historical museum for the story of the declaration. The journey begins with Herzl, goes through the establishment of Tel Aviv and Dizengoff’s work, and ends in the Hall of the Declaration of Independence, with a complete reenactment of the exciting announcement in Ben-Gurion’s voice.
  • Latrun – Police Station & Tank Museum - The Latrun Police Station was built on a strategic hilltop amid the foothills of Judea in the early 1940s, when the British ruled Israel. Today, the Latrun Police Station serves as a memorial site for all those who lost their lives fighting both for Israeli access to Jerusalem and for independence.
  • Ben-Gurion House in Tel Aviv - One of the smallest museums and likely the most overlooked is Ben-Gurion House, a historic house museum at 17 Ben-Gurion Boulevard that served as an additional residence for Israel’s first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion. Visitors can see Ben-Gurion’s library, his family’s sleeping quarters and the study where he worked. Take a free guided tour of the house and learn about Ben-Gurion’s life work.
  • Rabin Square & Memorial - Rabin Square (Kikar Rabin) is a large public plaza in Tel Aviv, Israel. Formerly called Israel Kings’ Square, it was renamed Rabin Square after Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was assassinated there in 1995.
  • The Diaspora Museum - The Museum of the Jewish People is often forgotten but this vast museum which vast and chronicles the history of Jews throughout the diaspora, throughout history is fascinating. It is undergoing a long refurbishment program which will end in 2014, and what has already been refurbished is incredible. Another name for this museum is Beit Hatfutsot.
  • The Palmach Museum - The Palmach Museum is an experiential museum that relays the incredible story of the elite striking force of the Hagana-the underground military organization of the Jewish community in Palestine, prior to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. Visitors to the museum join a group of new Palmach recruits from the establishment of the Palmach through to the end of the War of Independence.
  • Underground Bullet Factory Museum - Now a museum, the Ayalon Institute was a secret ammunition factory disguised as part of a kibbutz to fool the British back in the 1940s. Jewish people used the factory in their efforts to fight for the independent state of Israel.
  • Sahek Ota, Emek Hefer - This huge fun park is the only water park in Israel that operates all year round, with water parks in the summer, and heated pools and play areas in the winter. Plenty of great activities for the kids, with an extreme water park, fair rides, video games, mini golf, the Himalaya Bridge, a gymboree, and other great things to enjoy! There’s also a small museum.
  • Children’s Memorial - This unique memorial, hollowed out from an underground cavern, is a tribute to the approximately 1.5 million Jewish children who were murdered during the Holocaust. Memorial candles, a customary Jewish tradition to remember the dead, are reflected infinitely in a dark and somber space, creating the impression of millions of stars shining in the firmament. The names of murdered children, their ages and countries of origin can be heard in the background.
  • Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum - Yad Vashem, Israel’s main Holocaust remembrance and education center is situated on the green slopes of Har HaZikaron, (the Mount of Remembrance) in Jerusalem. Israel’s Holocaust commemoration project began in 1953 with the task of perpetuating the memory of Holocaust victims and documenting the history of the Jewish people during the Holocaust so that it will be remembered by future generations.
  • Underground Prisoners Museum - A museum located in a building that was built as an inn for women pilgrims, and was used as a prison during the British Mandate. There is a reconstruction of the prison on the site, including its various cells and devices, along with several exhibitions that describe the period of the British Mandate and the history of the underground struggle.
  • The Temple Institute - Witness with your own eyes treasures that have not been seen for 2,000 years! 70 reconstructed vessels of the Temple made from gold, silver and bronze have been created by top Israeli craftsmen according to the precise measurements dictated by the Sages. Amongst the vessels you will see include the Menorah, the Table of Showbread, the Golden Altar, the High Priest garments, a marble and gold model of Herod's Temple, Helena's Chandelier and dozens of other vessels.
  • Shrine of the Book - The Shrine of the Book in Jerusalem uses quirky contemporary architecture to house and display ancient manuscripts — including the first Dead Sea Scrolls to be discovered. The building’s white-tiled dome is shaped like the lid of the first jar in which the scrolls were found at Qumran. In contrast nearby stands a black basalt wall. The black-white imagery symbolises the theme of one of the scrolls — The War of the Sons of Light Against the Sons of Darkness
  • Rockefeller Archaeological Museum - Antiquities museum containing a rich collection of archaeological findings from excavations conducted throughout the Land of Israel during the British Mandate. The museum also holds temporary exhibitions.

See all museums.

Go top

Sleeping in Israel

Rothschild Hotel
  • Articles about hotels in Israel.
  • Camping sites in Israel. In Israel there are camping sites of course. The only problem is how to find them. I give you one wonderful tip, and that’s Google Maps. In Google maps you can search for “Camping sites in Israel” or “Camping sites in Tel Aviv” and the like.
  • Christian guesthouses in Jerusalem. Upon entering Christ Church, guests are immediately taken aback by the quiet and private gardens and interior courtyard, offering guests solace and a peaceful refuge from the crowded and bustling walkways outside the premises. Guest rooms are small and plainly furnished but are clean and comfortable and provide private bathroom facilities.
  • Hotels in Eilat. Eilat’s accommodation ranges from the good to the bad to the downright ugly – this is not a place to expect a charming or unique hotel experience. As is the case with most resort towns, the cost of hotel rooms rises by about 25% at weekends and 50% (or more) during Israeli school holidays and in July/August.
  • Messianic guesthouses in Israel.
  • Sleeping in Jerusalem old city. Most budget accommodation is located in the Old City’s Muslim, Christian and Armenian Quarters or in the city center. Decent mid-range options are thin on the ground, but there are plenty of choices in the top-end category, including atmospheric Christian hospices in the Old City and boutique hotels in the city center.
  • Sleeping in Eilat. Eilat’s accommodation ranges from the good to the bad to the downright ugly – this is not a place to expect a charming or unique hotel experience. As is the case with most resort towns, the cost of hotel rooms rises by about 25% at weekends and 50% (or more) during Israeli school holidays and in July/August.
  • Sleeping in Tel Aviv. There are accommodation choices to meet every budget and style requirement in Tel Aviv, but the city’s ever-expanding range of boutique hotels includes the most alluring options. The best location for visitors is the wedge of the south city center bounded by Rothschild Blvd, Sheinkin St and Allenby St, which is richly endowed with cafes and restaurants. It’s also within walking distance of most sights. Further away, Jaffa offers some stylish boutique options and a vibrant Arab-influenced street life.
  • Sleeping in Tel Aviv gallery.

See all hotels, see all camping sites, see all guest houses, see all hostels, see all boutique hotels.

Go top

Touring Israel

City of David
Visiting the city of David
  • 120 Minutes walk around the Old City walls. This is a small Walking tour you can do you self easily. I advise you to print this page or at least the maps. Some people (like my kids) will run this walking tour within a hour, others need at least two hours (like me with groups).
  • 120 Minutes walk around West Jerusalem. This walking tour in Jerusalem takes 2 hours. Really. If you attempt this tour at your own, print out the maps in this tour at least. But then you see much more then what’s mentioned in this walking tour, not to forget the home made lemonades, ice creams, cakes, sweets, extra ordinary shopping, cheap and amazing clothes and antiques, strange people, amazing buildings, peeking in a typical Jerusalem household and in their apartments, etc.
  • 2 Days in Tsfat (Safet). This is an article to spend your time in Tsfat, but instead of visiting this town for a couple of hours (like with most of the organized tours do), you spend two days at this ethereal place. Here I describe why and how. Here I talk about all the sights, neighborhoods, hotels, restaurants, prices, tips, entertainment, history, everything to make it possible to have your own tour without a guide. This is guide inside information shared with you. 
  • 27 Amusement parks.
  • 3 Days in Haifa tour. Haifa is one of the Middle East’s most picturesque cities, and it’s target for this small mini-tour for this amazing place. This page contains enough information for you to have this tour and spend it full with interesting sights, events, smells, tastes and experiences for the whole family.
  • 9 Farm tours for families. We have nine farm tours for people with families, but it’s more then okay to come without children too. This collection of farm tours is special, because it covers a variety of farm types. Please consider the farm tours in the south (desert).
  • Beaches, Marina, Seafront Cafes and Restaurants in Herzliya. Just 12km north of central Tel Aviv, Herzliya is popular due to its fine, clean beaches, marina mall and string of seafront cafes. Named after Theodor Herzl, the founder of modern Zionism, Herzliya started as a small farming community in 1924 and now consists of two main areas separated by Hwy 2.
  • Free day tours in Israel.
    • Day tour in Ein Bokek. Sandwiched between the turquoise waters of the southern Dead Sea and a dramatic tan bluff, Ein Bokek’s strip of luxury hotels is the region’s main tourist zone. Ein Bokek has the area’s nicest free beaches, and is the Dead Sea’s main center for treating ailments such as psoriasis, arthritis and respiratory conditions with naturally occurring minerals and compounds.
    • Day tour in Jerusalem. This tour is for any visitors to Jerusalem (or locals). This tour will bring you to all the important and well-known touristic sights the Jerusalem has to offer. The tour is designed for the individual, as for groups, with or without a professional guide.
    • Day tour in Kfar Cana. About 8 km northeast of central Nazareth on the road to Tiberias (and on the Jesus Trail), the Arab town of Kafr Kana (Cana) is believed to be the site of Jesus’s first miracle (John 2:1-11), when he changed water into wine at a wedding reception. About 10% of the population is Christian.This is a day tour, especially when you want to renew your wedding vows.
    • (Day) tour Masada. This is a day tour for you, which is dedicated to Masada. But in Israel everything is different when you get there, I added information about accommodations (guest house and camping sites). Also it’s a great idea to add some information about restaurants and of course how you get there and back to where you came from.
    • Day tour in Sodom. By tradition, this area is the site of Sodom and Gomorrah, the biblical cities that were destroyed in a storm of fire and brimstone, punishment from God because of their people’s depravity (Genesis 18-19). These days, Sodom is much better known for its desert hiking and cycling trails than for sodomy. And for that we have this day tour.
    • Day tour Sea of Galilee. This tour is for any visitors to Sea of Galilee (or locals). This tour will bring you to all the important and well-known touristic sights the Sea of Galilee and surroundings has to offer. The tour is designed for the individual, as for groups, with or without a professional guide.
    • Day tour Tel Aviv. This tour is for any visitors to the Holy Land (or locals). This tour will bring you to all the important and well-known touristic sights Tel Aviv has to offer. The tour is designed for the individual, as for groups, with or without a professional guide.
  • Half-day sunset jeep tour in Eilat. This highly popular 4 hour desert jeep tour runs daily from Eilat and explores the changing scenery of the Negev desert as day turns into night. Using open-topped jeeps for the full outdoor experience we cover some of the finest scenery in the Negev Desert.
  • Modern Jerusalem walking tour. This walking tour, which might take up 3-4 hours, leads you through modern Jerusalem. That ‘modern’ Jerusalem is relative, because we are talking from the year 1860! Anyway, you will visit all the major interesting sights from ‘modern’ Jerusalem on foot. As usual, print out this page or at least the maps. This walking tour is guide-less.
  • Negev desert Jeep Tours. A Negev Jeep Tour safari offers the ultimate way to explore and experience the Negev Desert which covers over 60% of Israel. The Negev begins just 90 minutes south of Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, so heading south for the day to explore is incredibly possible. With the region so undiscovered by tourists, a Negev Jeep Tour offers an insight into a beautiful region that is brimming with fascinating sites and treasures.
  • Southern Negev desert night tour. This desert jeep tour from Eilat allows you to experience the magic of an Arabian night, under the star spangled desert night skies. Running daily during the summer months, this unique desert tour explores the mountains of Eilat in the southern Negev Desert by 4X4 and follows the most scenic trails in the Eilat area.
  • Take a tour boat in the Red Sea at Eilat. For a boat trip out into the magical Red Sea, head to Eilat Marina (at the Eastern end of Eilat), which hosts a few glass-bottomed boats for tourists wanting to check out the Red Sea up close and personal. And you don’t even have to get your feet wet!
  • Timna valley and the Eilat mountains jeep tour. Jeep Tour – 4 hours afternoon tour from Eilat. The tour to the Timna park is four hour afternoon jeep tour covers the ancient sites of the Timna Valley and the scenic desert canyons of the Southern Negev and Arava Valley. The picturesque Timna Valley (park) is a UNESCO site of historical importance.
  • Touring Israel with the public transportation. Yes, it’s possible to tour Israel with the help of public transportation. There is no tour company, which is offering this and many people think it’s not possible, uneasy, hard, difficult and more of that jazz. But honestly, it’s a question of the right planning, because the public transportation in Israel is really good.
  • Walking tour in Jerusalem Old City. This tour gets you to the major sites in the old city of Jerusalem, some authentic restaurants, and many other interesting points in this ancient city with more then 4,000-year history. The best way to go for this walking tour is simply expect nothing and let this old city surprise you. And in case someone gets lost (like me), here is the street map of the old city.
  • Wine tour in Hamat Hanegev. In recent years the number of vineyards in the valleys and hills between Mitzpe Ramon and Be’er Sheva has grown significantly. These vineyards mark the first attempts to nurture grapes in the desert since the ancient Nabataeans made wine at Shivta and Avdat. Using innovative computerized watering methods (eg drip irrigation), today’s winegrowers have converted arid areas of dust into fertile land.

See all boat tours, cave tours, children tours, city tours, culture and history tours, family tours.

Go top

1 Comment

Please leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.