Battle of Megiddo – Egypt against Megiddo

The Battle of Megiddo (15th century BC) was fought between Egyptian forces under the command of Pharaoh Thutmose III and a large rebellious coalition of Canaanite vassal states led by the king of Kadesh.

Battle of Megiddo
Battle of Megiddo

Pharaoh Thutmose III set up camp with his armies (1,000 chariots and 10,000 infantry) at Megiddo at the end of the day. Megiddo had its army (also 1,000 chariots and 10,000 infantry) close positioned to the ancient city (that time already thousands of years old!).

Battle of Megiddo
Battle of Megiddo

Pharaoh Thutmose was an intelligent man and could think out of the box. During the first night he arrayed his forces very close to the enemy and in the early morning he attacked with everything he had. It cannot be established if the surprised King of Kadesh had managed to fully prepare for battle. Even if he did, it did not do him much good. Though his forces were on high ground adjacent to the fortress, the Egyptian line was arranged in a concave formation, consisting of three wings, that threatened both Canaanite flanks.

Battle of Megiddo
Battle of Megiddo

The Pharaoh led the attack from the center. The combination of position and numbers, superior maneuverability of their left wing along with an early, bold attack, broke the enemy’s will; their line immediately collapsed. Those near the city fled into it, closing the gates behind them.

Battle of Megiddo
Battle of Megiddo

The city was besieged for seven months and the King of Kadesh escaped. Pharaoh Thutmose built a moat and a wooden palisade, eventually forcing its occupants to surrender.

Battle of Megiddo
Battle of Megiddo

This battle was of great historical meaning, because it allowed Pharaoh Thutmose III the expand the Egyptian empire dramatically.

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