Ancient Sebastiya

The ancient city Sebastiya is rooted from Canaanite, Israelite, Hellenistic, Herodian, Roman and Byzantine Cultures. Currently, Sebastiya is falling under Palestinian rule, located about 12 kilometers northwest of Nablus, to the east of the road to Jenin. Currently, only two religions are making claims: the Christians and Muslims alike honor a connection to John the Baptist. The Romans used this site to worship the Roman empire! And earlier then all of them, this site was being used for the worship of Phoenician gods by the Canaanites (Baal and Astarte). Map.

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

To start with the Christians, John the Baptist’s disciples buried his body here after he was beheaded by Herod Antipas during the infamous banquet at which Salome’s dance enthralled the governor (Mark 6:21-29). An Orthodox Christian tradition holds that Sebastiya was also the venue for the governor’s birthday banquet, though the historian Josephus says it was in Herod’s fortress at Machaerus, in modern-day Jordan. Overlooking the present village of Sebastiya are the hilltop ruins of the royal city of Samaria. Excavations have uncovered evidence of six successive cultures: Canaanite, Israelite, Hellenistic, Herodian, Roman and Byzantine.

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

Omri, the sixth king of the northern kingdom of Israel, built his capital on the rocky hill of Samaria in the ninth and eighth centuries before Christ. His son Ahab fortified the city and, influenced by his wife Jezebel, a Phoenician princess, built temples to the Phoenician gods Baal (Lord of the Flies) and Astarte (Goddess of Fertility).

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

Ahab’s (devil’s worship, sacrificing children and worse) evil deeds incurred the wrath of the prophet Elijah, who prophesied bloody deaths for both Ahab and Jezebel. During its eventful history, Samaria was destroyed by Assyrians in 722 BC (ending the northern kingdom of Israel), captured by Alexander the Great in 331 BC, destroyed by the Maccabean King John Hyrcanus in 108 BC, and rebuilt by the Roman general Pompey in 63 BC.

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

Herod the Great expanded the city around 25 BC, renaming it Sebaste in honor of his patron Caesar Augustus (Sebaste is Greek for Augustus). Herod even built a temple dedicated to his patron, celebrated one of his many marriages in the city, and had two of his sons strangled there.

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

The pattern of destruction and rebuilding continued during the early Christian era. Sebaste became the seat of a bishop in the 4th century, was destroyed by an earthquake in the 6th century, flourished briefly under the Crusaders in the 12th century, then declined to the status of a village.

John’s Tomb

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

John the Baptist’s burial place was at Sebastiya, together with the remains of the prophets Elisha and Obadiah.

Around the year 390, St Jerome describes Sebastiya as “… where the remains of John the Baptist are guarded.”. By then, according to a contemporary account by the historian Rufinus of Aquileia around 362, pagans had desecrated the tomb during a persecution of Christians under emperor Julian the Apostate. The Baptist’s remains were burnt and the ashes dispersed. But all was not totally lost. In the night, when the pagans slept, monks saved some of the bones.

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

In the 6th century two urns covered in gold and silver were venerated by pilgrims. One was said to contain relics of John the Baptist, the other relics of Elisha. Two churches were built during the Byzantine period.

One was on the southern side of the Roman acropolis (on the site the Orthodox Church believes John was beheaded).

The other church, a cathedral built over the Baptist’s reputed tomb, was just east of the old city walls and within the present village. Rebuilt by the Crusaders, it became the second biggest church in the Holy Land (after the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem).

But after the Islamic conquest of 1187 the cathedral was transformed into a mosque dedicated to the prophet Yahya, the Muslim name for John the Baptist. The mosque, rebuilt in 1892 within the ruins of the cathedral, is still in use.

Sebastiya
Sebastiya
Sebastiya
Sebastiya

Pilgrims still visit the tomb associated with John the Baptist and other prophets. Under a small domed building in the cathedral ruins, a narrow flight of 21 steps leads down to a tomb chamber with six burial niches set in the wall. Tradition places John the Baptist’s relics in the lower row, between those of Elisha and Obadiah.

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

The remains of the cathedral’s huge buttressed walls dominate Sebastiya’s public square.

In the extensive archaeological park at the top of the hill are remnants of Ahab’s palace, identified by the discovery of carved ivory that was mentioned in the Bible (1 Kings 22:39). The ivory pieces are displayed in the Rockefeller Museum, Jerusalem.

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

Also to be seen are the stone steps leading to Herod the Great’s temple of Augustus, an 800-metre colonnaded street, a Roman theater and forum, and a city gate flanked by two watchtowers.

Sebastiya
Sebastiya

Interest in Sebastiya’s heritage and community — now entirely Muslim except for one Christian family — has been revived in the early 21st century by a project involving the Franciscan non-profit organization ATS Pro Terra Sancta, funded by Italian aid.

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